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Textus Receptus Bibles

Matthew's Bible 1537

 

   

4:1Then shall seuen wyues take holde of one man, and saye: we wil laye all oure meate and clothing together in comen, only that we may be called thy wyues, & that this shameful reprofe may be taken from vs.
4:2After that tyme shall the braunche of the Lorde be bewtyfull & myghtye, & the frute of the earth shall be fayre & pleasaunte for those Israelites that shall bringe thereof.
4:3Then shall the remnaunt in Syon and the remnaunte at Ierusalem be called holye: namelye all suche as are wrytten amonge the lyuynge at Ierusalem:
4:4what time as the Lorde shall washe awaye the desolacion of the doughters of Syon, & pourge the bloude out from Ierusalem wt the wynde of his smoke & fyre.
4:5Moreouer vpon al the dwellynges of the hyl of Syon, and vpon their whole congregacyon, shal the Lord prouyde a cloude & smoke by daye, and the shynynge of a flammynge fyre by nyght: for all their glorye shalbe preserued.
4:6And Ierusalem shall be a tabernacle for a shadowe because of hete in the daye tyme, a place and refuge where a man may kepe him for wether and rayne.
Matthew's Bible 1537

Matthew's Bible 1537

The Matthew Bible, also known as Matthew's Version, was first published in 1537 by John Rogers, under the pseudonym "Thomas Matthew". It combined the New Testament of William Tyndale, and as much of the Old Testament as he had been able to translate before being captured and put to death, with the translations of Myles Coverdale as to the balance of the Old Testament and the Apocrypha, except the Apocryphal Prayer of Manasses. It is thus a vital link in the main sequence of English Bible translations.