Loading...

Textus Receptus Bibles

Matthew's Bible 1537

 

   

38:1Not longe afore thys, was Hezekiah sick vnto the deeth: and the Prophet Esay the sonne of Amoz came vnto hym, & sayde: Thus commaundeth the Lord: Set thine house in ordre: for thou must dye, and shalt not escape.
38:2Then Hezekiah turned hys face towarde the wall, and prayed vnto the Lorde,
38:3and sayde: Remembre (O Lorde) that I haue walcked before the in treuth and a stedfast herte, and haue done the thyng that is pleasaunt to the. And Hezekiah wepte sore.
38:4Then sayde God vnto Esay:
38:5Go and speake vnto Hezekiah: the Lorde God of Dauid thy father sendeth the thys worde: I haue herde thy prayer, and consydred thy teares: beholde I wyll put fyftene yeares mo vnto thy lyfe,
38:6and delyuer the and the cytie also, from the hande of the kynge of Assiria, for I wyll defende the citie.
38:7And take the this token of the Lord, that he wyll do it, as he hath spoken:
38:8Beholde, I will returne the shadowe of Ahaz dial, that now is layed out wyth the Sunne & brynge it ten degrees backe warde. So the Sunne turned ten degree backward, the which he was descended a fore.
38:9A thanckesgeuynge, whiche Hezekiah Kynge of Iuda wrote, when he had bene sycke, and was recouered.
38:10I thought I shulde haue gone to the gates of hell in my best age, and haue wanted the resydue of my yeares.
38:11I spake with in my selfe: I shall neuer viset the Lorde God in this lyfe: I shall neuer se man amonge the dwellers of the worlde.
38:12Myne age is folden vp together, and taken awaye fro me, lyke a shepherdes cotage: my lyfe is hewen of, lyke as a weeuer cutteth of his webb. Whyle I was yet takynge my rest, he hewed me of, & made an ende of me in one day.
38:13I thought I wolde haue lyued vnto the morow, but he brosed my bones lyke a lyon, and made an ende of me in one daye.
38:14Then chatred I lyke a swalowe, and lyke a crane, and mourned as a doue. I lyfte vp myne eyes into the heyght: O Lorde (sayde I) vyolence is done vnto me, be thou suertye for me.
38:15What shall I speake or saye, that he may this do? That I may lyue out all my yeares, yee in the bytternesse of my lyfe?
38:16Verely (Lorde) men must lyue in bytternesse, & all my life muste I passe ouer therin: For thou raysest me vp, and wakest me. But lo, I wyllbe well content with this bytternes.
38:17Neuertheles my conuersacyon hath so pleased the, that thou woldest not make an ende of my lyfe: so that thou hast cast all my synnes behynde thy back.
38:18For hell prayseth not the, death doth not magnyfye the. They that go downe into the graue, prayse not thy trueth:
38:19but the lyuyng, yee the liuinge acknowledge the, lyke as I do thys daye. The father telleth hys chyldren of thy faythfulnesse.
38:20Delyuer vs (O Lorde) and we wyll singe prayses in thy house, all the dayes of oure life.
38:21And Esay sayde: take a playster of fygges, and laye it vpon the sore, so shall it be whole.
38:22Then sayd Hezekiah: O what a great thinge is this, that I shall go vp into the house of the Lorde.
Matthew's Bible 1537

Matthew's Bible 1537

The Matthew Bible, also known as Matthew's Version, was first published in 1537 by John Rogers, under the pseudonym "Thomas Matthew". It combined the New Testament of William Tyndale, and as much of the Old Testament as he had been able to translate before being captured and put to death, with the translations of Myles Coverdale as to the balance of the Old Testament and the Apocrypha, except the Apocryphal Prayer of Manasses. It is thus a vital link in the main sequence of English Bible translations.