Loading...

Textus Receptus Bibles

King James Bible 1611

 

   

4:1And in that day seuen women shall take hold of one man, saying, We will eate our owne bread, & weare our owne apparell: onely let vs be called by thy name, to take away our reproch.
4:2In that day shall the Branch of the Lord be beautifull and glorious, and the fruit of the earth shalbe excellent and comely for them that are escaped of Israel.
4:3And it shall come to passe, that hee that is left in Zion, and hee that remaineth in Ierusalem, shall be called Holy, euen euery one that is written among the liuing in Ierusalem,
4:4When the Lord shall haue washed away the filth of the daughters of Zion, and shall haue purged the blood of Ierusalem from the middest thereof, by the spirit of iudgement, and by the spirit of burning.
4:5And the Lord will create vpon euery dwelling place of mount Zion, and vpon her assemblies a cloude, and smoke by day, and the shining of a flaming fire by night; for vpon all the glory shall be a defence.
4:6And there shalbe a tabernacle for a shadow in the day time from the heat, and for a place of refuge, and for a couert from storme and from raine.
King James Bible 1611

King James Bible 1611

The commissioning of the King James Bible took place at a conference at the Hampton Court Palace in London England in 1604. When King James came to the throne he wanted unity and stability in the church and state, but was well aware that the diversity of his constituents had to be considered. There were the Papists who longed for the English church to return to the Roman Catholic fold and the Latin Vulgate. There were Puritans, loyal to the crown but wanting even more distance from Rome. The Puritans used the Geneva Bible which contained footnotes that the king regarded as seditious. The Traditionalists made up of Bishops of the Anglican Church wanted to retain the Bishops Bible.

The king commissioned a new English translation to be made by over fifty scholars representing the Puritans and Traditionalists. They took into consideration: the Tyndale New Testament, the Matthews Bible, the Great Bible and the Geneva Bible. The great revision of the Bible had begun. From 1605 to 1606 the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609 the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge (16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as "The 1611 King James Bible" came off the printing press.