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Textus Receptus Bibles

Coverdale Bible 1535

 

   

7:1Ivdge not, that ye be not iudged:
7:2For as ye iudge, so shal ye be iudged. And with what measure ye meete, with the same shall it be measured to you agayne.
7:3Why seist thou a moate in thy brothers eye, and perceauest not the beame yt is yn thine awne eye?
7:4Or why saiest thou to yi brother: holde, I wil plucke the moate out of thyne eye, and beholde, a beame is in thyne awne eye.
7:5Ypocryte, fyrst cast out the beame out of thyne awne eye, and then shalt thou se clearly, to plucke out the moate out of thy brothers eye.
7:6Geue not that which is holy, to dogges: nether cast ye youre pearles before swyne, lest they treade them vnder their fete, & the other turne agayne and all to rente you.
7:7Axe, and it shalbe geuen you: Seke, and ye shall fynde: knocke, and it shalbe opened vnto you.
7:8For whosoeuer axeth, receaueth: and he that seketh, fyndeth: and to hym yt knocketh, it shal opened.
7:9Ys there eny man amonge you, which yf his sonne axed hym bred, wolde offer him a stone?
7:10Or yf he axed fysshe, wolde he proffer hym a serpent?
7:11yf ye then which are euell, can geue youre chyldren good gyftes: how moche more shall youre father which is in heauen, geue good thynges to them that axe hym?
7:12Therfore what soeuer ye wolde that me shulde do to you, eue so do ye to them. This ys the lawe and the Prophetes.
7:13Enter in at the strayte gate: for wyde is the gate, and broade is the waye, that leadeth to destruccion: & many there be, which go in therat.
7:14But strayte is the gate, and narowe ys the waye, which leadeth vnto lyfe, and fewe there be that fynde it.
7:15Beware of false Prophetes, which come to you in shepes clothinge, but inwardly they are rauenynge wolues,
7:16Ye shall knowe them by their frutes. Do men gather grapes of thornes? or figges of thistles?
7:17Euen so euery good tree bryngeth forth good frute. But a corrupte tree, bryngeth forth euyl frute,
7:18A good tree can not bryng forth bad frute: nother can a rotten tre bringe forth good frute.
7:19Euery tre that bryngeth not forth good frute, shalbe hewen downe, and cast into the fyre.
7:20Wherfore by their frutes ye shall knowe them.
7:21Not all they that saye vnto me, LORDE LORDE, shall enter in to the kyngdome of heauen: but he that doth the will of my father which ys in heauen.
7:22Many shall saye to me in that daye: LORDE, LORDE: haue we not prophecied in thy name? Haue we not cast out deuyls in thy name? Haue we not done many greate dedes in thy name?
7:23And then will I knowlege vnto them: I neuer knewe you, Departe fro me, ye workers of iniquite.
7:24Whosoeuer therfore heareth of me these sayinges, and doeth the same, I wyll lycke hym vnto a wyse man, which buylt hys house vpon a rocke:
7:25Now whan abundaunce of rayne descended, and the wyndes blewe and bet vpon that same house, it fel not, because it was grounded on the rocke.
7:26And who soeuer heareth of me these sayinges, & doth the not, shalbe lyckened vnto a folysh ma, which buylt his housse apon the sonde:
7:27Now whan abudaunce of rayne desceded, & the wyndes blewe, & bet vpon yt housse, it fell, and great was the fall of it.
7:28And it came to passe, that when Iesus had ended these saynges, the people were astonnyed at hys doctryne.
7:29For he taught them as one hauynge power, and not as the Scribes.
Coverdale Bible 1535

Coverdale Bible 1535

The Coverdale Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale and published in 1535, was the first complete English translation of the Bible to contain both the Old and New Testament and translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. The later editions (folio and quarto) published in 1539 were the first complete Bibles printed in England. The 1539 folio edition carried the royal license and was, therefore, the first officially approved Bible translation in English.

Tyndale never had the satisfaction of completing his English Bible; but during his imprisonment, he may have learned that a complete translation, based largely upon his own, had actually been produced. The credit for this achievement, the first complete printed English Bible, is due to Miles Coverdale (1488-1569), afterward bishop of Exeter (1551-1553).

The details of its production are obscure. Coverdale met Tyndale in Hamburg, Germany in 1529, and is said to have assisted him in the translation of the Pentateuch. His own work was done under the patronage of Oliver Cromwell, who was anxious for the publication of an English Bible; and it was no doubt forwarded by the action of Convocation, which, under Archbishop Cranmer's leading, had petitioned in 1534 for the undertaking of such a work.

Coverdale's Bible was probably printed by Froschover in Zurich, Switzerland and was published at the end of 1535, with a dedication to Henry VIII. By this time, the conditions were more favorable to a Protestant Bible than they had been in 1525. Henry had finally broken with the Pope and had committed himself to the principle of an English Bible. Coverdale's work was accordingly tolerated by authority, and when the second edition of it appeared in 1537 (printed by an English printer, Nycolson of Southwark), it bore on its title-page the words, "Set forth with the King's most gracious license." In licensing Coverdale's translation, King Henry probably did not know how far he was sanctioning the work of Tyndale, which he had previously condemned.

In the New Testament, in particular, Tyndale's version is the basis of Coverdale's, and to a somewhat less extent this is also the case in the Pentateuch and Jonah; but Coverdale revised the work of his predecessor with the help of the Zurich German Bible of Zwingli and others (1524-1529), a Latin version by Pagninus, the Vulgate, and Luther. In his preface, he explicitly disclaims originality as a translator, and there is no sign that he made any noticeable use of the Greek and Hebrew; but he used the available Latin, German, and English versions with judgment. In the parts of the Old Testament which Tyndale had not published he appears to have translated mainly from the Zurich Bible. [Coverdale's Bible of 1535 was reprinted by Bagster, 1838.]

In one respect Coverdale's Bible was groundbreaking, namely, in the arrangement of the books of the. It is to Tyndale's example, no doubt, that the action of Coverdale is due. His Bible is divided into six parts -- (1) Pentateuch; (2) Joshua -- Esther; (3) Job -- "Solomon's Balettes" (i.e. Canticles); (4) Prophets; (5) "Apocrypha, the books and treatises which among the fathers of old are not reckoned to be of like authority with the other books of the Bible, neither are they found in the canon of the Hebrew"; (6) the New Testament. This represents the view generally taken by the Reformers, both in Germany and in England, and so far as concerns the English Bible, Coverdale's example was decisive.