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Textus Receptus Bibles

Coverdale Bible 1535

 

   

19:1And it came to passe, wha Iesus had ended these sayenges, he gat him fro Galile, & came i to ye coastes of Iewry beyonde Iordane,
19:2& moch people folowed him, and he healed them there.
19:3Then came vnto him the Pharises & tepted him, & sayde vnto him: Is it laufull for a man to put awaye his wife for eny maner of cause?
19:4He answered & sayde vnto the: Haue ye not red, how yt he which made (man) at the begynnynge, made the ma & woma,
19:5& sayde: For this cause shal a ma leaue father & mother, & cleue vnto his wife, & they two shalbe one fleshe.
19:6Now are they not twayne then, but one flesh. Let not man therfore put a sunder, yt which God hath coupled together.
19:7Then sayde they: Why dyd Moses then comaunde to geue a testimonyall of deuorsement, & to put her awaye?
19:8He sayde vnto the: Moses (because of ye hardnes of yor hertes) suffred you to put awaye youre wyues: Neuertheles fro the begynnynge it hath not bene so.
19:9But I saye vnto you: Whosoeuer putteth awaye his wife (excepte it be for fornicacion) and marieth another, breaketh wedlocke. And who so marieth her yt is deuorced, commytteth aduoutrye.
19:10Then sayde his disciples vnto him: Yf ye matter be so betwene ma and wife, the is it not good to mary.
19:11But he sayde vnto them: All me can not coprehende yt sayenge, saue they to who it is geue.
19:12For there be some gelded, which are so borne from their mothers wombe: and there be some gelded, which are gelded of men: & there be some gelded, which haue gelded the selues for the kyngdome of heauens sake. He that can coprehende it, let him comprehe
19:13Then were brought vnto him yoge children, yt he shulde put his hondes vpon the, & praye. And ye disciples rebuked them.
19:14But Iesus sayde: Suffre ye childre, & forbyd the not to come vnto me, for vnto soch belogeth the kyngdome of heauen.
19:15And wha he had layed his hodes vpo the, he departed thece.
19:16And beholde, one came vnto him, and sayde: Good master, what good shal I do, yt I maye haue the euer lastinge life?
19:17He sayde vnto him: Why callest thou me good? there is none good, but God onely. Neuertheles yf thou wilt entre into life, kepe ye comaudemetes.
19:18The sayde, he vnto him: Which? Iesus saide: Thou shalt not kyll: thou shalt not breake wedlocke: thou shalt not steale: thou shalt beare no false wytnes:
19:19Honoure father and mother: and thou shalt loue thy neghboure as thy self.
19:20Then sayde the yonge ma vnto him: All these haue I kepte fro my youth vp: what lack I yet?
19:21Iesus sayde vnto him: Yf thou wilt be perfecte, go thy waye and sell that thou hast, & geue it vnto the poore, and thou shalt haue a treasure in heauen, and come and folowe me.
19:22Whan ye yonge man herde yt worde, he wente awaye sory, for he had greate possessions.
19:23Iesus sayde vnto his disciples: Verely I saie vnto you: it shalbe harde for a rich man to entre in to the kyngdome of heaue.
19:24And morouer I saye vnto you: It is easier for a Camell to go thorow the eye of a nedle, the for a rich man to entre in to the kyngdome of heauen.
19:25Whan his disciples herde that, they were exceadingly amased, and sayde: Who can the be saued?
19:26Neuertheles Iesus behelde them, and sayde vnto them: With men it is vnpossyble, but with God all thinges are possyble.
19:27Then answered Peter & sayde vnto him: Beholde, we haue forsake all, and folowed the: What shal we haue therfore?
19:28Iesus sayde vnto the: Verely I saye vnto you: that when the sonne of man shal sytt in the seate of his maiestye, ye which haue folowed me in the new byrth, shal syt also vpon twolue seates, and iudge ye twolue trybes of Israel.
19:29And who so euer forsaketh houses or brethre, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or londes, for my names sake, the same shal receaue an hundreth folde, and inheret euerlastinge life.
19:30But many that be the first, shalbe the last: and the last shalbe the first.
Coverdale Bible 1535

Coverdale Bible 1535

The Coverdale Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale and published in 1535, was the first complete English translation of the Bible to contain both the Old and New Testament and translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. The later editions (folio and quarto) published in 1539 were the first complete Bibles printed in England. The 1539 folio edition carried the royal license and was, therefore, the first officially approved Bible translation in English.

Tyndale never had the satisfaction of completing his English Bible; but during his imprisonment, he may have learned that a complete translation, based largely upon his own, had actually been produced. The credit for this achievement, the first complete printed English Bible, is due to Miles Coverdale (1488-1569), afterward bishop of Exeter (1551-1553).

The details of its production are obscure. Coverdale met Tyndale in Hamburg, Germany in 1529, and is said to have assisted him in the translation of the Pentateuch. His own work was done under the patronage of Oliver Cromwell, who was anxious for the publication of an English Bible; and it was no doubt forwarded by the action of Convocation, which, under Archbishop Cranmer's leading, had petitioned in 1534 for the undertaking of such a work.

Coverdale's Bible was probably printed by Froschover in Zurich, Switzerland and was published at the end of 1535, with a dedication to Henry VIII. By this time, the conditions were more favorable to a Protestant Bible than they had been in 1525. Henry had finally broken with the Pope and had committed himself to the principle of an English Bible. Coverdale's work was accordingly tolerated by authority, and when the second edition of it appeared in 1537 (printed by an English printer, Nycolson of Southwark), it bore on its title-page the words, "Set forth with the King's most gracious license." In licensing Coverdale's translation, King Henry probably did not know how far he was sanctioning the work of Tyndale, which he had previously condemned.

In the New Testament, in particular, Tyndale's version is the basis of Coverdale's, and to a somewhat less extent this is also the case in the Pentateuch and Jonah; but Coverdale revised the work of his predecessor with the help of the Zurich German Bible of Zwingli and others (1524-1529), a Latin version by Pagninus, the Vulgate, and Luther. In his preface, he explicitly disclaims originality as a translator, and there is no sign that he made any noticeable use of the Greek and Hebrew; but he used the available Latin, German, and English versions with judgment. In the parts of the Old Testament which Tyndale had not published he appears to have translated mainly from the Zurich Bible. [Coverdale's Bible of 1535 was reprinted by Bagster, 1838.]

In one respect Coverdale's Bible was groundbreaking, namely, in the arrangement of the books of the. It is to Tyndale's example, no doubt, that the action of Coverdale is due. His Bible is divided into six parts -- (1) Pentateuch; (2) Joshua -- Esther; (3) Job -- "Solomon's Balettes" (i.e. Canticles); (4) Prophets; (5) "Apocrypha, the books and treatises which among the fathers of old are not reckoned to be of like authority with the other books of the Bible, neither are they found in the canon of the Hebrew"; (6) the New Testament. This represents the view generally taken by the Reformers, both in Germany and in England, and so far as concerns the English Bible, Coverdale's example was decisive.