Loading...

Interlinear Textus Receptus Bibles shown verse by verse.

Textus Receptus Bible chapters shown in parallel with your selection of Bibles.

Compares the 1550 Stephanus Textus Receptus with the King James Bible.

Visit the library for more information on the Textus Receptus.

Textus Receptus Bibles

King James Bible 1611

 

   

11:1And there shall come forth a rod out of the stemme of Iesse, and a branch shal grow out of his rootes.
11:2And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest vpon him, the spirit of wisedome and vnderstanding, the spirit of counsell and might, the spirit of knowledge, and of the feare of the Lord:
11:3And shal make him of quicke vnderstanding in the feare of the Lord, and he shall not iudge after the sight of his eyes, neither reproue after the hearing of his eares.
11:4But with righteousnesse shall he iudge the poore, and reprooue with equitie, for the meeke of the earth: and he shall smite the earth with the rodde of his mouth, and with the breath of his lips shall he slay the wicked.
11:5And righteousnesse shalbe the girdle of his loines, and faithfulnesse the girdle of his reines.
11:6The wolfe also shall dwell with the lambe, and the leopard shall lie downe with the kid: and the calfe and the yong lion, and the fatling together, and a litle child shall lead them.
11:7And the cow and the beare shall feed, their yong ones shall lie downe together: and the lyon shall eate straw like the oxe.
11:8And the sucking childe shall play on the hole of the aspe, and the weaned childe shall put his hand on the cockatrice denne.
11:9They shall not hurt nor destroy in all my holy mountaine: for the earth shall bee full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters couer the sea.
11:10And in that day there shall bee a roote of Iesse, which shall stand for an ensigne of the people; to it shall the Gentiles seeke, and his rest shall bee glorious.
11:11And it shall come to passe in that day, that the Lord shall set his hande againe the second time, to recouer the remnant of his people which shalbe left, from Assyria, and from Egypt, & from Pathros, and from Cush, and from Elam, and from Shinar, and from Hamath, and from the ylands of the Sea.
11:12And he shall set vp an ensigne for the nations, and shall assemble the outcasts of Israel, and gather together the dispersed of Iudah, from the foure corners of the earth.
11:13The enuie also of Ephraim shal depart, and the aduersaries of Iudah shalbe cut off: Ephraim shall not enuie Iudah, and Iudah shall not vexe Ephraim.
11:14But they shall fly vpon the shoulders of the Philistines toward the West, they shall spoile them of the East together: they shall lay their hand vpon Edom and Moab, and the children of Ammon shall obey them.
11:15And the Lord shall vtterly destroy the tongue of the Egyptian sea, and with his mighty wind shall hee shake his hand ouer the riuer, and shall smite it in the seuen streames, and make men goe ouer dry-shod.
11:16And there shalbe an high way for the remnant of his people, which shalbe left from Assyria; like as it was to Israel in the day that hee came vp out of the land of Egypt.
King James Bible 1611

King James Bible 1611

The commissioning of the King James Bible took place at a conference at the Hampton Court Palace in London England in 1604. When King James came to the throne he wanted unity and stability in the church and state, but was well aware that the diversity of his constituents had to be considered. There were the Papists who longed for the English church to return to the Roman Catholic fold and the Latin Vulgate. There were Puritans, loyal to the crown but wanting even more distance from Rome. The Puritans used the Geneva Bible which contained footnotes that the king regarded as seditious. The Traditionalists made up of Bishops of the Anglican Church wanted to retain the Bishops Bible.

The king commissioned a new English translation to be made by over fifty scholars representing the Puritans and Traditionalists. They took into consideration: the Tyndale New Testament, the Matthews Bible, the Great Bible and the Geneva Bible. The great revision of the Bible had begun. From 1605 to 1606 the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609 the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge (16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as "The 1611 King James Bible" came off the printing press.