Loading...

Interlinear Textus Receptus Bibles shown verse by verse.

Textus Receptus Bible chapters shown in parallel with your selection of Bibles.

Compares the 1550 Stephanus Textus Receptus with the King James Bible.

Visit the library for more information on the Textus Receptus.

Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

11:1But there shall come a rodde foorth of the stocke of Ishai, and a grasse shall growe out of his rootes.
11:2And the Spirite of the Lord shall rest vpon him: the Spirite of wisedome and vnderstanding, the Spirite of counsell and strength, the Spirite of knowledge, and of the feare of the Lord,
11:3And shall make him prudent in the feare of the Lord: for he shall not iudge after the sight of his eies, neither reproue by ye hearing of his eares.
11:4But with righteousnesse shall he iudge the poore, and with equitie shall he reprooue for the meeke of the earth: and he shall smite the earth with the rod of his mouth, and with the breath of his lippes shall he slay the wicked.
11:5And iustice shall be ye girdle of his loynes, and faithfulnesse the girdle of his reines.
11:6The wolfe also shall dwell with the lambe, and the leopard shall lie with the kid, and the calfe, and the lyon, and the fat beast together, and a litle childe shall leade them.
11:7And the kow and the beare shall feede: their yong ones shall lie together: and the lyon shall eate strawe like the bullocke.
11:8And the sucking childe shall play vpon the hole of the aspe, and the wained childe shall put his hand vpon the cockatrice hole.
11:9Then shall none hurt nor destroy in all the mountaine of mine holines: for the earth shalbe full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters that couer the sea.
11:10And in that day the roote of Ishai, which shall stand vp for a signe vnto the people, the nations shall seeke vnto it, and his rest shall be glorious.
11:11And in the same day shall the Lord stretche out his hand againe the second time, to possesse the remnant of his people, (which shalbe left) of Asshur, and of Egypt, and of Pathros, and of Ethiopia, and of Elam, and of Shinear, and of Hamath, and of the yles of the sea.
11:12And he shall set vp a signe to the nations, and assemble the dispersed of Israel, and gather the scattered of Iudah from the foure corners of the worlde.
11:13The hatred also of Ephraim shall depart, and the aduersaries of Iudah shalbe cut off: Ephraim shall not enuie Iudah, neither shall Iudah vexe Ephraim:
11:14But they shall flee vpon the shoulders of the Philistims toward the West: they shall spoyle them of the East together: Edom and Moab shall be the stretching out of their hands, and the children of Ammon in their obedience.
11:15The Lord also shall vtterly destroy the tongue of the Egyptians sea, and with his mightie winde shall lift vp his hand ouer the riuer, and shall smite him in his seuen streames, and cause men to walke therein with shooes.
11:16And there shalbe a path to the remnant of his people, which are left of Asshur, like as it was vnto Israel in the day that he came vp out of the land of Egypt.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.