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Textus Receptus Bibles

King James Bible 1611

 

   

47:1Come downe and sit in the dust: O virgin daughter of Babylon, sit on the ground: there is no throne, O daughter of the Caldeans: for thou shalt no more be called tender and delicate.
47:2Take the milstones and grinde meale, vncouer thy lockes: make bare the legge: vncouer the thigh, passe ouer the riuers.
47:3Thy nakednes shalbe vncouered, yea thy shame shalbe seene: I will take vengeance, and I will not meet thee as a man.
47:4As for our redeemer, the Lord of hostes is his Name, the Holy one of Israel.
47:5Sit thou silent, and get thee into darknes, O daughter of the Caldeans: for thou shalt no more be called the Ladie of kingdomes.
47:6I was wroth with my people: I haue polluted mine inheritance, and giuen them into thine hand: thou didst shew them no mercy; vpon the ancient hast thou very heauily layed the yoke.
47:7And thou saydst, I shall bee a Ladie for euer: so that thou didst not lay these things to thy heart, neither didst remember the later end of it.
47:8Therefore heare now this, thou that art giuen to pleasures, that dwellest carelesly, that sayest in thine heart, I am, and none else besides mee, I shall not sit as a widow, neither shall I know the losse of children.
47:9But these two things shall come to thee in a moment in one day; the losse of children, and widowhood; they shall come vpon thee in their perfection, for the multitude of thy sorceries, and for the great abundance of thine inchantments.
47:10For thou hast trusted in thy wickednesse: thou hast said, None seeth me. Thy wisedome and thy knowledge, it hath peruerted thee, and thou hast said in thine heart, I am, and none else besides me.
47:11Therefore shall euill come vpon thee, thou shalt not know from whence it riseth: and mischiefe shall fall vpon thee, thou shalt not be able to put it off: and desolation shall come vpon thee suddenly, which thou shalt not know.
47:12Stand now with thine inchantments, and with the multitude of thy sorceries, wherein thou hast laboured from thy youth; if so be thou shalt be able to profite, if so be thou mayest preuaile.
47:13Thou art wearied in the multitude of thy counsels: let now the astrologers, the starre-gazers, the monethly prognosticators stand vp, and saue thee from these things that shall come vpon thee.
47:14Behold, they shall be as stubble: the fire shall burne them, they shall not deliuer themselues from the power of the flame: there shall not bee a coale to warme at, nor fire to sit before it.
47:15Thus shal they be vnto thee with whom thou hast laboured, euen thy merchants from thy youth, they shall wander euery one to his quarter: none shall saue thee.
King James Bible 1611

King James Bible 1611

The commissioning of the King James Bible took place at a conference at the Hampton Court Palace in London England in 1604. When King James came to the throne he wanted unity and stability in the church and state, but was well aware that the diversity of his constituents had to be considered. There were the Papists who longed for the English church to return to the Roman Catholic fold and the Latin Vulgate. There were Puritans, loyal to the crown but wanting even more distance from Rome. The Puritans used the Geneva Bible which contained footnotes that the king regarded as seditious. The Traditionalists made up of Bishops of the Anglican Church wanted to retain the Bishops Bible.

The king commissioned a new English translation to be made by over fifty scholars representing the Puritans and Traditionalists. They took into consideration: the Tyndale New Testament, the Matthews Bible, the Great Bible and the Geneva Bible. The great revision of the Bible had begun. From 1605 to 1606 the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609 the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge (16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as "The 1611 King James Bible" came off the printing press.