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Textus Receptus Bibles

Julia E. Smith Translation 1876

 

   

16:1And the Pharisees and Sadducees having come, tempting, asked him to shew them a sign from heaven.
16:2And he having answered, said to them, It being evening, ye say, Calm weather: for the heaven is fiery red.
16:3And in the morning, Today, wintry weather: for heaven, being sad, is fiery red. Hypocrites, truly ye know to decide the face of heaven, but the signs of the times ye cannot.
16:4An evil and adulterous generation seeks for a sign; and no sign shall be given her, except the sign of Jonas the prophet. And having left them, he departed.
16:5And his disciples having come to the other side, forgot to take loaves.
16:6And Jesus said to them, Attend and keep from the leaven of the Pharisees and the Sadducees.
16:7And they reasoned among themselves, saying, Because we took no loaves.
16:8And Jesus having known, said to them, Why reason ye among yourselves, O ye of little faith, because ye have taken no loaves
16:9Do ye not yet understand, nor remember the five loaves of five thousand, and how many baskets ye took?
16:10Nor the seven loaves of four thousand, and how many wicker baskets ye took?
16:11How do ye not understand that I spake not to you concerning bread, to keep from the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees?
16:12Then understood they that he spake, not to keep from the leaven of bread, but from the teaching of the Pharisees and Sadducees.
16:13And Jesus, having come into the parts of Caesarea of Philippi, asked his disciples, saying, Whom do men say me to be, the Son of Man?
16:14And they said, Some, truly, John the Baptist: and others, Elias; and others, Jeremias, or one of the prophets.
16:15And he says to them, But whom say ye me to be?
16:16And Simon Peter having answered, said, Thou art Christ, the Son of the living God.
16:17And Jesus, having answered, said to him, Happy art thou, Simon Barjona: for flesh and blood has not revealed to thee, but my Father, he in the heavens.
16:18And I say to thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock will I build my church; and the gates of hell shall not overcome her.
16:19And I will give thee the keys of the kingdom of the heavens: and whatever thou shalt bind upon earth shall be bound in the heavens: and whatever thou shalt loose upon earth shall be loosed in the heavens.
16:20Then he enjoined his disciples that they say to none that he is Jesus Christ.
16:21From then Jesus began to shew to his disciples, that he must depart to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised in the third day.
16:22And Peter having taken him, began to reproach him, saying, Be propitious to thyself, Lord: this shall not be to thee.
16:23And having turned, he said to Peter, Retire behind me, Satan: thou art an offence, to me: for thou hast not in mind the things of God, but the things of men.
16:24Then said Jesus to his disciples, If any wish to come after me, let him deny himself absolutely, and lift up his cross, and follow me.
16:25For whoever should wish to save his life shall lose it: and whoever shall lose his soul for my sake shall find it.
16:26For what is a man profited, if he should gain the whole world, and injure his soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?
16:27For the Son of man is about to come in the glory of his Father with his messengers; and then he will give back to each according to his deed.
16:28Verily I say to you, Some are standing here, who should not taste of death, till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom.
Julia Smith and her sister

Julia E. Smith Translation 1876

The Julia Evelina Smith Parker Translation is considered the first complete translation of the Bible into English by a woman. The Bible was titled The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments; Translated Literally from the Original Tongues, and was published in 1876.

Julia Smith, of Glastonbury, Connecticut had a working knowledge of Latin, Greek and Hebrew. Her father had been a Congregationalist minister before he became a lawyer. Having read the Bible in its original languages, she set about creating her own translation, which she completed in 1855, after a number of drafts. The work is a strictly literal rendering, always translating a Greek or Hebrew word with the same word wherever possible. Smith accomplished this work on her own in the span of eight years (1847 to 1855). She had sought out no help in the venture, even writing, "I do not see that anybody can know more about it than I do." Smith's insistence on complete literalness, plus an effort to translate each original word with the same English word, combined with an odd notion of Hebrew tenses (often translating the Hebrew imperfect tense with the English future) results in a translation that is mechanical and often nonsensical. However, such a translation if overly literal might be valuable to consult in checking the meaning of some individual verse. One notable feature of this translation was the prominent use of the Divine Name, Jehovah, throughout the Old Testament of this Bible version.

In 1876, at 84 years of age some 21 years after completing her work, she finally sought publication. The publication costs ($4,000) were personally funded by Julia and her sister Abby Smith. The 1,000 copies printed were offered for $2.50 each, but her household auction in 1884 sold about 50 remaining copies.

The translation fell into obscurity as it was for the most part too literal and lacked any flow. For example, Jer. 22:23 was given as follows: "Thou dwelling in Lebanon, building as nest in the cedars, how being compassionated in pangs coming to thee the pain as in her bringing forth." However, the translation was the only Contemporary English translation out of the original languages available to English readers until the publication of The British Revised Version in 1881-1894.(The New testament was published in 1881, the Old in 1884, and the Apocrypha in 1894.) This makes it an invaluable Bible for its period.