Loading...

Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

8:1Now God remembred Noah and euery beast, and all the cattell that was with him in the Arke: therefore God made a winde to passe vpon the earth, and the waters ceased.
8:2The fountaines also of the deepe and the windowes of heauen were stopped and the raine from heauen was restrained,
8:3And the waters returned from aboue the earth, going and returning: and after the ende of the hundreth and fiftieth day the waters abated.
8:4And in the seuenth moneth, in the seuenteenth day of the moneth, the Arke rested vpon the mountaines of Ararat.
8:5And the waters were going and decreasing vntill the tenth moneth: in the tenth moneth, and in the first day of the moneth were the toppes of the mountaines seene.
8:6So after fourtie dayes, Noah opened the windowe of the Arke, which he had made,
8:7And sent forth a rauen, which went out going forth and returning, vntill the waters were dried vp vpon the earth.
8:8Againe he sent a doue from him, that he might see if the waters were diminished from off the earth.
8:9But the doue found no rest for the sole of her foote: therefore she returned vnto him into the Arke (for the waters were vpon the whole earth) and he put forth his hand, and receiued her, and tooke her to him into the Arke.
8:10And he abode yet other seuen dayes, and againe he sent forth the doue out of the Arke.
8:11And the doue came to him in ye euening, and loe, in her mouth was an oliue leafe that she had pluckt: whereby Noah knewe that the waters were abated from off the earth.
8:12Notwithstanding he wayted yet other seuen dayes, and sent forth the doue, which returned not againe vnto him any more.
8:13And in the sixe hundreth and one yeere, in the first day of the first moneth the waters were dryed vp from off the earth: and Noah remoued the couering of the Arke and looked, and beholde, the vpper part of the ground was drie.
8:14And in the second moneth, in the seuen and twentieth day of the moneth was the earth drie.
8:15Then God spake to Noah, saying,
8:16Goe forth of the Arke, thou and thy wife, and thy sonnes and thy sonnes wiues with thee.
8:17Bring forth with thee euery beast that is with thee, of all flesh, both foule and cattell, and euery thing that creepeth and moueth vpon the earth, that they may breede abundantly in ye earth, and bring forth fruite and increase vpon ye earth.
8:18So Noah came forth, and his sonnes, and his wife, and his sonnes wiues with him.
8:19Euery beast, euery creeping thing, and euery foule, all that moueth vpon the earth after their kindes went out of the Arke.
8:20Then Noah built an altar to the Lord and tooke of euery cleane beast, and of euery cleane foule, and offered burnt offerings vpon the altar.
8:21And the Lord smellled a sauour of rest, and the Lord said in his heart, I will hencefoorth curse the ground no more for mans cause: for the imagination of mans heart is euill, euen from his youth: neither will I smite any more all things liuing, as I haue done.
8:22Hereafter seede time and haruest, and colde and heate, and sommer and winter, and day and night shall not cease, so long as ye earth remaineth.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.