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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

21:1Nowe the Lord visited Sarah, as he had saide, and did vnto her according as he had promised.
21:2For Sarah conceiued, and bare Abraham a sonne in his olde age, at the same season that God tolde him.
21:3And Abraham called his sonnes name that was borne vnto him, which Sarah bare him, Izhak.
21:4Then Abraham circumcised Izhak his sonne, when he was eight dayes olde, as God had commanded him.
21:5So Abraham was an hundreth yeere olde, when his sonne Izhak was borne vnto him.
21:6Then Sarah said, God hath made me to reioyce: all that heare will reioyce with me.
21:7Againe she said, Who would haue saide to Abraham, that Sarah shoulde haue giuen children sucke? for I haue borne him a sonne in his olde age.
21:8Then the childe grewe and was weaned: and Abraham made a great feast the same day that Izhak was weaned.
21:9And Sarah sawe the sonne of Hagar the Egyptian (which she had borne vnto Abraham) mocking.
21:10Wherefore she saide vnto Abraham, Cast out this bond woman and her sonne: for ye sonne of this bonde woman shall not be heire with my sonne Izhak.
21:11And this thing was very grieuous in Abrahams sight, because of his sonne.
21:12But God said vnto Abraham, Let it not be grieuous in thy sight for the childe, and for thy bonde woman: in all that Sarah shall say vnto thee, heare her voyce: for in Izhak shall thy seede be called.
21:13As for the sonne of the bond woman, I will make him a nation also, because he is thy seede.
21:14So Abraham arose vp early in ye morning, and tooke bread, and a bottell of water, and gaue it vnto Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, and the childe also, and sent her away: who departing wandred in the wildernesse of Beer-sheba.
21:15And when the water of the bottell was spent, she cast the childe vnder a certaine tree.
21:16Then she went and sate her ouer against him a farre off about a bowe shoote: for she said, I will not see the death of the child. and she sate downe ouer against him, and lift vp her voyce and wept.
21:17Then God heard the voyce of ye childe, and the Angel of God called to Hagar from heauen, and said vnto her, What aileth thee, Hagar? feare not, for God hath heard the voyce of the childe where he is.
21:18Arise, take vp the childe, and holde him in thine hand: for I will make of him a great people.
21:19And God opened her eyes, and she sawe a well of water. so she went and filled the bottell with water, and gaue the boy drinke.
21:20So God was with the childe, and he grewe and dwelt in the wildernesse, and was an archer.
21:21And he dwelt in the wildernesse of Paran, and his mother tooke him a wife out of the land of Egypt.
21:22And at that same time Abimelech and Phichol his chief captaine spake vnto Abraham, saying, God is with thee in all that thou doest.
21:23Nowe therefore sweare vnto me here by God, that thou wilt not hurt me, nor my children, nor my childrens children: thou shalt deale with me, and with the countrey, where thou hast bene a stranger, according vnto the kindnesse that I haue shewed thee.
21:24Then Abraham said, I will sweare.
21:25And Abraham rebuked Abimelech for a well of water, which Abimelechs seruants had violently taken away.
21:26And Abimelech saide, I knowe not who hath done this thing: also thou toldest me not, neither heard I of it but this day.
21:27Then Abraham tooke sheepe and beeues, and gaue them vnto Abimelech: and they two made a couenant.
21:28And Abraham set seuen lambes of the flocke by themselues.
21:29Then Abimelech said vnto Abraham, What meane these seuen lambes, which thou hast set by themselues?
21:30And he answered, Because thou shalt receiue of mine hand these seuen lambes, that it may be a witnes vnto me, that I haue digged this well.
21:31Wherefore the place is called Beer-sheba, because there they both sware.
21:32Thus made they a couenant at Beer-sheba: afterward Abimelech and Phichol his chiefe captaine rose vp, and turned againe vnto the land of the Philistims.
21:33And Abraham planted a groue in Beer-sheba, and called there on the Name of ye Lord, the euerlasting God.
21:34And Abraham was a stranger in the Philistims land a long season.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.