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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

42:1Then Iaakob saw that there was foode in Egypt, and Iaakob said vnto his sonnes, Why gaze ye one vpon an other?
42:2And he said, Behold, I haue heard that there is foode in Egypt, Get you downe thither, and bie vs foode thence, that we may liue and not die.
42:3So went Iosephs ten brethren downe to bye corne of the Egyptians.
42:4But Beniamin Iosephs brother woulde not Iaakob send with his brethren: for he saide, Least death should befall him.
42:5And the sonnes of Israel came to bye foode among them that came: for there was famine in the land of Canaan.
42:6Now Ioseph was gouerner of the land, who solde to all the people of the lande: then Iosephs brethren came, and bowed their face to the groud before him.
42:7And when Ioseph sawe his brethren, hee knewe them, and made himselfe straunge toward them, and spake to them roughly, and saide vnto them, Whence come yee? Who answered, Out of the land of Canaan, to bye vitaile.
42:8(Now Ioseph knewe his brethren, but they knew not him.
42:9And Ioseph remembred the dreames, which he dreamed of them) and he sayde vnto them, Ye are spies, and are come to see the weaknesse of the land.
42:10But they sayde vnto him, Nay, my lorde, but to bye vitayle thy seruants are come.
42:11Wee are all one mans sonnes: wee meane truely, and thy seruants are no spies.
42:12But he saide vnto them, Nay, but yee are come to see the weakenes of the land.
42:13And they said, We thy seruants are twelue brethren, the sonnes of one man in the lande of Canaan: and beholde, the yongest is this day with our father, and one is not.
42:14Againe Ioseph sayde vnto them, This is it that I spake vnto you, saying, Ye are spies.
42:15Hereby ye shall be proued: by the life of Pharaoh, ye shall not goe hence, except your yongest brother come hither.
42:16Send one of you which may fet your brother, and ye shall be kept in prison, that your words may be proued, whether there bee trueth in you: or els by the life of Pharaoh ye are but spies.
42:17So he put them in warde three dayes.
42:18Then Ioseph said vnto them the third day, This do, and liue: for I feare God.
42:19If ye be true men, let one of your brethren be bounde in your prison house, and goe ye, carie foode for the famine of your houses:
42:20But bring your yonger brother vnto me, that your wordes may be tried, and that ye dye not: and they did so.
42:21And they said one to another, We haue verily sinned against our brother, in that we sawe the anguish of his soule, when he besought vs, and we would not heare him: therefore is this trouble come vpon vs.
42:22And Reuben answered them, saying, Warned I not you, saying, Sinne not against the childe, and ye would not heare? and lo, his blood is now required.
42:23(And they were not aware that Ioseph vnderstoode them: for he spake vnto them by an interpreter.)
42:24Then he turned from them, and wept, and turned to them againe, and communed with them, and tooke Simeon from among them, and bounde him before their eyes.
42:25So Ioseph commanded that they should fill their sackes with wheate, and put euery mans money againe in his sacke, and giue them vitaile for the iourney: and thus did he vnto them.
42:26And they layed their vitaile vpon their asses, and departed thence.
42:27And as one of them opened his sacke for to giue his asse prouender in the ynne, he espyed his money: for lo, it was in his sackes mouth.
42:28Then he sayde vnto his brethren, My money is restored: for loe, it is euen in my sacke. And their heart fayled them, and they were astonished, and sayde one to another, What is this, that God hath done vnto vs?
42:29And they came vnto Iaakob their father vnto the lande of Canaan, and tolde him all that had befallen them, saying,
42:30The man, who is Lord of the lande, spake roughly to vs, and put vs in prison as spyes of the countrey.
42:31And we sayd vnto him, We are true men, and are no spies.
42:32We be twelue brethren, sonnes of our father: one is not, and the yongest is this day with our father in the land of Canaan.
42:33Then the Lord of the countrey sayde vnto vs, Hereby shall I knowe if ye be true men: Leaue one of your brethren with me, and take foode for the famine of your houses and depart,
42:34And bring your yongest brother vnto me, that I may knowe that ye are no spies, but true men: so will I deliuer you your brother, and yee shall occupie in the land.
42:35And as they emptied their sacks, behold, euery mans bundel of money was in his sacke: and when they and their father sawe the bundels of their money, they were afrayde.
42:36Then Iaakob their father said to them, Ye haue robbed me of my children: Ioseph is not, and Simeon is not, and ye will take Beniamin: all these things are against me.
42:37Then Reuben answered his father, saying, Slay my two sonnes, if I bring him not to thee againe: deliuer him to mine hand, and I will bring him to thee againe.
42:38But he said, My sonne shall not go downe with you: for his brother is dead, and he is left alone: if death come vnto him by the way which ye goe, then ye shall bring my gray head with sorow vnto the graue.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.