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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

2:1Thus the heauens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.
2:2For in the seuenth day GOD ended his worke which he had made, and the seuenth day he rested from al his worke, which he had made.
2:3So God blessed the seuenth day, and sanctified it, because that in it he had rested from all his worke, which God had created and made.
2:4These are the generations of the heauens and of the earth, when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heauens,
2:5And euery plant of the fielde, before it was in the earth, and euery herbe of the field, before it grewe: for the Lord God had not caused it to raine vpon the earth, neither was there a man to till the ground,
2:6But a myst went vp from the earth, and watered all the earth.
2:7The Lord God also made the man of the dust of the grounde, and breathed in his face breath of life, and the man was a liuing soule.
2:8And the Lord God planted a garden Eastward in Eden, and there he put the man whom he had made.
2:9(For out of the ground made the Lord God to grow euery tree pleasant to the sight, and good for meate: the tree of life also in the mids of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and of euill.
2:10And out of Eden went a riuer to water the garden, and from thence it was deuided, and became into foure heads.
2:11The name of one is Pishon: the same compasseth the whole land of Hauilah, where is golde.
2:12And the golde of that land is good: there is Bdelium, and the Onix stone.
2:13And the name of the seconde riuer is Gihon: the same compasseth the whole lande of Cush.
2:14The name also of the third riuer is Hiddekel: this goeth toward the Eastside of Asshur: and the fourth riuer is Perath)
2:15Then the Lord God tooke the man, and put him into the garden of Eden, that he might dresse it and keepe it.
2:16And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Thou shalt eate freely of euery tree of the garden,
2:17But of the tree of knowledge of good and euill, thou shalt not eate of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt die the death.
2:18Also the Lord God saide, It is not good that the man should be himself alone: I wil make him an helpe meete for him.
2:19So the Lord God formed of the earth euery beast of the fielde, and euery foule of the heauen, and brought them vnto the man to see howe he would call them: for howsoeuer the man named the liuing creature, so was the name thereof.
2:20The man therefore gaue names vnto all cattell, and to the foule of the heauen, and to euery beast of the fielde: but for Adam founde he not an helpe meete for him.
2:21Therefore the Lord God caused an heauie sleepe to fall vpon the man, and he slept: and he tooke one of his ribbes, and closed vp the flesh in steade thereof.
2:22And the ribbe which the Lord God had taken from the man, made he a woman, and brought her to the man.
2:23Then the man said, This now is bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh. She shalbe called woman, because she was taken out of man.
2:24Therefore shall man leaue his father and his mother, and shall cleaue to his wife, and they shall be one flesh.
2:25And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.