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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

10:1Now these are the generations of the sonnes of Noah, Shem, Ham and Iapheth: vnto whom sonnes were borne after the flood.
10:2The sonnes of Iapheth were Gomer and Magog, and Madai, and Iauan, and Tubal, and Meshech, and Tiras.
10:3And the sonnes of Gomer, Ashkenaz, and Riphath, and Togarmah.
10:4Also the sonnes of Iauan, Elishah and Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim.
10:5Of these were the yles of the Gentiles deuided in their landes, euery man after his tongue, and after their families in their nations.
10:6Moreouer, ye sonnes of Ham were Cush, and Mizraim, and Put, and Canaan.
10:7And the sonnes of Cush, Seba and Hauilah, and Sabtah, and Raamah, and Sabtecha: also the sonnes of Raamah were Sheba and Dedan.
10:8And Cush begate Nimrod, who began to be mightie in the earth.
10:9He was a mightie hunter before the Lord. wherefore it is saide, As Nimrod the mightie hunter before the Lord.
10:10And the beginning of his kingdome was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.
10:11Out of that land came Asshur, and builded Niniueh, and the citie Rehoboth, and Calah:
10:12Resen also betweene Niniueh and Calah: this is a great citie.
10:13And Mizraim begate Ludim, and Anamim, and Lehabim, and Naphtuhim.
10:14Pathrusim also, and Casluhim (out of whom came the Philistims) and Caphtorims.
10:15Also Canaan begat Zidon his first borne, and Heth,
10:16And Iebusi, and Emori, and Girgashi,
10:17And Hiui, and Arki, and Sini,
10:18And Aruadi, and Zemari, and Hamathi: and afterwarde were the families of the Canaanites spred abroade.
10:19Then the border of the Canaanites was from Zidon, as thou commest to Gerar vntil Azzah, and as thou goest vnto Sodom, and Gomorah, and Admah, and Zeboijm, euen vnto Lasha.
10:20These are the sonnes of Ham according to their families, according to their tongues in their countries and in their nations.
10:21Vnto Shem also the father of all the sonnes of Eber, and elder brother of Iapheth were children borne.
10:22The sonnes of Shem were Elam and Asshur, and Arpachshad, and Lud, and Aram.
10:23And the sonnes of Aram, Vz and Hul, and Gether and Mash.
10:24Also Arpachshad begate Shelah, and Shelah begate Eber.
10:25Vnto Eber also were borne two sonnes: the name of the one was Peleg: for in his dayes was the earth diuided: and his brothers name was Ioktan.
10:26Then Ioktan begate Almodad and Sheleph, and Hazarmaueth, and Ierah,
10:27And Hadoram, and Vzal, and Dicklah,
10:28And Obal, and Abimael, and Sheba,
10:29And Ophir, and Hauilah, and Iobab: all these were the sonnes of Ioktan.
10:30And their dwelling was from Mesha, as thou goest vnto Sephar a mount of the East.
10:31These are the sonnes of Shem according to their families, according to their tongues, in their countreis and nations.
10:32These are the families of the sonnes of Noah, after their generations among their people: and out of these were the nations diuided in the earth after the flood.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.