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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

13:1Then Abram went vp from Egypt, he, and his wife, and all that he had, and Lot with him toward the South.
13:2And Abram was very rich in cattell, in siluer and in golde.
13:3And he went on his iourney from ye South toward Beth-el, to the place where his tent had bene at ye beginning, betweene Beth-el and Haai,
13:4Vnto the place of the altar, which he had made there at the first: and there Abram called on the Name of the Lord.
13:5And Lot also, who went with Abram, had sheepe, and cattell and tentes,
13:6So that the land coulde not beare them, that they might dwell together: for their substance was great, so that they coulde not dwell together.
13:7Also there was debate betweene ye heardmen of Abrams cattell, and the heardmen of Lots cattell. (and the Canaanites and the Perizzites dwelled at that time in the land.)
13:8Then saide Abram vnto Lot, Let there be no strife, I pray thee, betweene thee and me, neither betweene mine heardmen and thine heardmen: for we be brethren.
13:9Is not the whole land before thee? depart I pray thee from me: if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will goe to the right: or if thou goe to the right hand, then I will take the left.
13:10So when Lot lifted vp his eyes, he saw that all the plaine of Iorden was watered euery where: (for before the Lord destroyed Sodom and Gomorah, it was as the garden of the Lord, like the land of Egypt, as thou goest vnto Zoar)
13:11Then Lot chose vnto him all the plaine of Iorden, and tooke his iourney from the East: and they departed the one from the other.
13:12Abram dwelled in the lande of Canaan, and Lot abode in the cities of the plaine, and pitched his tent euen to Sodom.
13:13Now the men of Sodom were wicked and exceeding sinners against the Lord.
13:14Then the Lord saide vnto Abram, (after that Lot was departed from him) Lift vp thine eyes nowe, and looke from the place where thou art, Northward, and Southward, and Eastwarde, and Westward:
13:15For all the land, which thou seest, will I giue vnto thee and to thy seede for euer,
13:16And I will make thy seede, as the dust of the earth: so that if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seede be numbred.
13:17Arise, walke through the land, in ye length thereof, and breadth thereof: for I will giue it vnto thee.
13:18Then Abram remoued his tent, and came and dwelled in the plaine of Mamre, which is in Hebron, and builded there an altar vnto ye Lord.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.