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Textus Receptus Bibles

Bishops Bible 1568

 

   

2:1The heauens also & the earth were finisshed, & all the hoast of them
2:2And in the seuenth day God ended his worke whiche he had made. And the seueth day he rested from all his worke which he had made
2:3And God blessed the seuenth daye, & sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his worke whiche God ordeyned to make
2:4These are the generations of the heauens and of the earth when they were created, in the day when the Lord God made the earth and the heauens
2:5And euery plant of the fielde before it was in the earth, and euery hearbe of the fielde before it grewe. For the Lord God had not yet caused it to rayne vppon the earth, neither was there a man to tyll the grounde
2:6But there went vp a miste from the earth, & watered the whole face of the grounde
2:7The Lorde God also dyd shape man, euen dust fro of the grounde, & breathed into his nosethrylles the breath of lyfe, and man was a lyuyng soule
2:8And the Lord God planted a garden eastwarde in Eden, and there he put the man whom he had shapen
2:9Moreouer, out of the grounde made the Lorde God to growe euery tree, that was fayre to syght, and pleasaunt to eate: The tree of lyfe in the myddest of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and euyll
2:10And out of Eden there went foorth a flood to water the garden, and from thence it was deuided, and became into foure heades
2:11The name of ye first is Pison, the same is it that compasseth the whole lande of Hauilah, where there is golde
2:12And the golde of the lande is very good. There is also Bdellium, and the Onix stone
2:13The name of the seconde riuer is Gyhon: the same is it that compasseth the whole lande of Ethiopia
2:14The name of ye thirde ryuer is Hidekel, & it goeth toward the east side of Assiria: & the fourth ryuer is Euphrates
2:15And the Lord God toke the man, and put hym in the garden of Eden, that he myght worke it, and kepe it
2:16And the Lorde God commaunded the man, saying: eating, thou shalt eate of euery tree of the garden
2:17But as touching the tree of knowlege of good and euyll thou shalt not eate of it: For in what daye so euer thou eatest therof, thou shalt dye the death
2:18And the Lord God sayde: It is not good yt the man should be alone, I wyll make hym an helpe lyke vnto hym
2:19And so out of the grounde the Lorde God had shapen euery beast of the field, and euery foule of the ayre, and brought it vnto man, that he myght see howe he woulde call it. For lykewyse as man hym selfe named euery lyuyng thyng, euen so was the name therof
2:20And the man gaue names to all cattell, and foule of the ayre, & euery beast of the fielde: but for man founde he not an helpe lyke vnto hym
2:21The Lord God caused a deepe sleepe to fall vpon Adam, and he slept, and he toke one of his ribbes, and closed vp the place with fleshe in steade therof
2:22And the ribbe which the lord god had taken from man, made he a woman, & brought her vnto the man
2:23And man saide: this is nowe bone of my bones, and fleshe of my fleshe, she shalbe called woman, because she was taken out of man
2:24For this cause shall man leaue his father and his mother, and shalbe ioyned with his wyfe: and they shall become one fleshe
2:25And they were both naked the man and his wife, and were not ashamed
Bishops Bible 1568

Bishops Bible 1568

The Bishops' Bible was produced under the authority of the established Church of England in 1568. It was substantially revised in 1572, and the 1602 edition was prescribed as the base text for the King James Bible completed in 1611. The thorough Calvinism of the Geneva Bible offended the Church of England, to which almost all of its bishops subscribed. They associated Calvinism with Presbyterianism, which sought to replace government of the church by bishops with government by lay elders. However, they were aware that the Great Bible of 1539 , which was the only version then legally authorized for use in Anglican worship, was severely deficient, in that much of the Old Testament and Apocrypha was translated from the Latin Vulgate, rather than from the original Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek. In an attempt to replace the objectionable Geneva translation, they circulated one of their own, which became known as the Bishops' Bible.