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Textus Receptus Bibles

Coverdale Bible 1535

 

   

13:1This is ye heuy burthe of Babilo, which Esaye the sonne of Amos dyd se.
13:2Make some tokes to the hie hilles, call vnto them, holde vp youre hode, that the prynces maye go in at the dore.
13:3For I will sende for my debites and my gyautes (sayeth the LORDE) and in my wrath I will call for soch, as tryumphe in my glory.
13:4With that, me thought I herde in the moutaynes, a noyse, like as it had bene of a greate people: and a ru?shinge, as though the kyngdomes of all nacions had come together. (And the LORDE of hoostes was the captayne of the whole armye.)
13:5As they had come not only out of farre countrees, but also from the endes of the heaues: Eue the LORDE himself with the ministers of his wrath, to destroye the whole lode.
13:6Mourne therfore, for the daye of the LORDE is at honde, and commeth as a destroyer from ye allmighty.
13:7Then shall all hondes be letten downe, and all mens hertes shal melt awaie,
13:8they shal stonde in feare, carefulnesse and sorowe shal come vpo them, and they shal haue payne, as a woman that traueleth with childe. One shall euer be aba?shed of another, & their faces shal burne, like ye flame.
13:9For lo, the daye of the LORDE shall come, terrible, full of indignacion and wrath: to make the londe waist, and to root out the synne therof.
13:10For the starres and planetes of heauen shal not geue their light, the Sonne shalbe quenched in the rysinge, and the Mone shal not shyne with his light.
13:11And I wil punysh the wickednesse of the worlde, & the synnes of the vngodly, sayeth the LORDE. The hye stomackes of the proude will I take awaye, and will laye downe the boostinge of tyrauntes.
13:12I will make a man dearer the fyne golde, and a man to be more worth, the a golden wedge of Ophir.
13:13Morouer, I will so shake the heaue, that the earth shall remo out of hir place. Thus shall it go wt Babilon, in the wrath of the LORDE of hoostes in ye daye of his fearfull indignacio.
13:14And Babilon shalbe as an hunted or chased doo, and as a flocke wt out a shepherde. Euery ma shal turne to his owne people, & fle echone into his owne londe.
13:15Who so is founde alone, shalbe shot thorow: And who so gather together, shalbe destroyed wt the swerde.
13:16Their children shalbe slayne before their eyes, their houses spoyled, & their wyues rauyshed.
13:17For lo, I shall bringe vp ye Medes agaynst the, which shal not regarde syluer, nor be desyrous of golde.
13:18Then shall yonge mens bowes be knapped asunder. The Medes shal haue no pitie vpo wome wt childe, & their faces shall not spare ye childre.
13:19And Babilo (yt glory of kigdomes and bewtie of the Caldees honor) shalbe destroyed, eue as God destroyed Sodom & Gomorra.
13:20It shal neuer be more inhabited, nether shal there be eny more dwellinge there, from generacion to generacion. The Arabians shall make no mo tentes there, nether shall the shepardes make their foldes there eny more:
13:21but wylde beastes shal lie there, & ye houses shalbe full of greate Oules. Estriches shal dwell there, & Apes shal daunse there:
13:22The litle Oules shall crie in the palaces, one after another, & Dragos shalbe in the pleasaut perlours. And as for Babilons tyme, it is at honde, & hir dayes maye not be longe absent.
Coverdale Bible 1535

Coverdale Bible 1535

The Coverdale Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale and published in 1535, was the first complete English translation of the Bible to contain both the Old and New Testament and translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. The later editions (folio and quarto) published in 1539 were the first complete Bibles printed in England. The 1539 folio edition carried the royal license and was, therefore, the first officially approved Bible translation in English.

Tyndale never had the satisfaction of completing his English Bible; but during his imprisonment, he may have learned that a complete translation, based largely upon his own, had actually been produced. The credit for this achievement, the first complete printed English Bible, is due to Miles Coverdale (1488-1569), afterward bishop of Exeter (1551-1553).

The details of its production are obscure. Coverdale met Tyndale in Hamburg, Germany in 1529, and is said to have assisted him in the translation of the Pentateuch. His own work was done under the patronage of Oliver Cromwell, who was anxious for the publication of an English Bible; and it was no doubt forwarded by the action of Convocation, which, under Archbishop Cranmer's leading, had petitioned in 1534 for the undertaking of such a work.

Coverdale's Bible was probably printed by Froschover in Zurich, Switzerland and was published at the end of 1535, with a dedication to Henry VIII. By this time, the conditions were more favorable to a Protestant Bible than they had been in 1525. Henry had finally broken with the Pope and had committed himself to the principle of an English Bible. Coverdale's work was accordingly tolerated by authority, and when the second edition of it appeared in 1537 (printed by an English printer, Nycolson of Southwark), it bore on its title-page the words, "Set forth with the King's most gracious license." In licensing Coverdale's translation, King Henry probably did not know how far he was sanctioning the work of Tyndale, which he had previously condemned.

In the New Testament, in particular, Tyndale's version is the basis of Coverdale's, and to a somewhat less extent this is also the case in the Pentateuch and Jonah; but Coverdale revised the work of his predecessor with the help of the Zurich German Bible of Zwingli and others (1524-1529), a Latin version by Pagninus, the Vulgate, and Luther. In his preface, he explicitly disclaims originality as a translator, and there is no sign that he made any noticeable use of the Greek and Hebrew; but he used the available Latin, German, and English versions with judgment. In the parts of the Old Testament which Tyndale had not published he appears to have translated mainly from the Zurich Bible. [Coverdale's Bible of 1535 was reprinted by Bagster, 1838.]

In one respect Coverdale's Bible was groundbreaking, namely, in the arrangement of the books of the. It is to Tyndale's example, no doubt, that the action of Coverdale is due. His Bible is divided into six parts -- (1) Pentateuch; (2) Joshua -- Esther; (3) Job -- "Solomon's Balettes" (i.e. Canticles); (4) Prophets; (5) "Apocrypha, the books and treatises which among the fathers of old are not reckoned to be of like authority with the other books of the Bible, neither are they found in the canon of the Hebrew"; (6) the New Testament. This represents the view generally taken by the Reformers, both in Germany and in England, and so far as concerns the English Bible, Coverdale's example was decisive.