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Interlinear Textus Receptus Bibles shown verse by verse.

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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

53:1Who will beleeue our report? and to whom is the arme of the Lord reueiled?
53:2But hee shall growe vp before him as a branche, and as a roote out of a dry grounde: he hath neither forme nor beautie: when we shall see him, there shall be no forme that wee should desire him.
53:3He is despised and reiected of men: he is a man full of sorowes and hath experience of infirmities: we hidde as it were our faces from him: he was despised and we esteemed him not.
53:4Surely hee hath borne our infirmities, and caried our sorowes: yet wee did iudge him, as plagued, and smitten of God, and humbled.
53:5But hee was wounded for our transgressions, hee was broken for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was vpon him, and with his stripes we are healed.
53:6All we like sheepe haue gone astraye: wee haue turned euery one to his owne way, and the Lord hath layed vpon him the iniquitie of vs all.
53:7Hee was oppressed and he was afflicted, yet did he not open his mouth: hee is brought as a sheepe to the slaughter, and as a sheepe before her shearer is dumme, so he openeth not his mouth.
53:8Hee was taken out from prison, and from iudgement: and who shall declare his age? for he was cut out of the lande of the liuing: for the transgression of my people was he plagued.
53:9And he made his graue with the wicked, and with the riche in his death, though hee had done no wickednesse, neither was any deceite in his mouth.
53:10Yet the Lord would breake him, and make him subiect to infirmities: when hee shall make his soule an offring for sinne, he shall see his seede and shall prolong his dayes, and the will of the Lord shall prosper in his hand.
53:11Hee shall see of the trauaile of his soule, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous seruant iustifie many: for hee shall beare their iniquities.
53:12Therefore will I giue him a portion with the great, and he shall deuide the spoyle with the strong, because hee hath powred out his soule vnto death: and he was counted with the transgressers, and he bare the sinne of many, and prayed for the trespassers.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.