Loading...

Interlinear Textus Receptus Bibles shown verse by verse.

Textus Receptus Bible chapters shown in parallel with your selection of Bibles.

Compares the 1550 Stephanus Textus Receptus with the King James Bible.

Visit the library for more information on the Textus Receptus.

Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

65:1I have bene sought of them that asked not: I was found of them that sought me not: I sayd, Beholde me, beholde me, vnto a nation that called not vpon my Name.
65:2I haue spred out mine handes all the day vnto a rebellious people, which walked in a way that was not good, euen after their owne imaginations:
65:3A people that prouoked me euer vnto my face: that sacrificeth in gardens, and burneth incense vpon brickes.
65:4Which remaine among the graues, and lodge in the desarts, which eate swines flesh, and the broth of things polluted are in their vessels.
65:5Which say, Stand apart, come not neere to me: for I am holier then thou: these are a smoke in my wrath and a fire that burneth all the day.
65:6Beholde, it is written before me: I wil not keepe silence, but will render it and recompense it into their bosome.
65:7Your iniquities and the iniquities of your fathers shalbe together (sayth the Lord) which haue burnt incense vpon the mountaines, and blasphemed me vpon the hilles: therefore wil I measure their olde worke into their bosome.
65:8Thus sayth the Lord, As the wine is found in the cluster, and one sayth, Destroy it not, for a blessing is in it, so will I doe for my seruants sakes, that I may not destroy them whole.
65:9But I will bring a seede out of Iaakob, and out of Iudah, that shall inherit my mountaine: and mine elect shall inherit it, and my seruants shall dwell there.
65:10And Sharon shalbe a sheepefolde, and the valley of Achor shalbe a resting place for the cattell of my people, that haue sought me.
65:11But ye are they that haue forsaken the Lord and forgotten mine holy Mountaine, and haue prepared a table for the multitude, and furnish the drinke offerings vnto the number.
65:12Therefore wil I number you to the sword, and all you shall bowe downe to the slaughter, because I called, and ye did not answere: I spake, and ye heard not, but did euil in my sight, and did chuse that thing which I would not.
65:13Therefore thus saith the Lord God, Beholde, my seruants shall eate, and ye shalbe hungrie: beholde, my seruants shall drinke, and ye shall be thirstie: beholde, my seruants shall reioyce, and ye shalbe ashamed.
65:14Beholde, my seruants shall sing for ioye of heart, and ye shall crye for sorow of heart, and shall howle for vexation of minde.
65:15And ye shall leaue your name as a curse vnto my chosen: for the Lord God shall slay you and call his seruants by another name.
65:16He that shall blesse in the earth, shall blesse himselfe in the true God, and he that sweareth in the earth, shall sweare by the true God: for the former troubles are forgotten, and shall surely hide themselues from mine eyes.
65:17For lo, I will create newe heauens and a new earth: and the former shall not be remembred nor come into minde.
65:18But be you glad and reioyce for euer in the things that I shall create: for beholde, I will create Ierusalem, as a reioycing and her people as a ioye,
65:19And I wil reioyce in Ierusalem, and ioye in my people, and the voyce of weeping shall be no more heard in her, nor the voyce of crying.
65:20There shall be no more there a childe of yeeres, nor an olde man that hath not filled his dayes: for he that shall be an hundreth yeeres old, shall dye as a yong man: but the sinner being an hundreth yeeres olde shall be accursed.
65:21And they shall build houses and inhabite them, and they shall plant vineyards, and eate the fruite of them.
65:22They shall not build, and another inhabite: they shall not plant, and another eate: for as the dayes of the tree are the dayes of my people, and mine elect shall inioye in olde age the worke of their handes.
65:23They shall not labour in vaine, nor bring forth in feare: for they are the seede of the blessed of the Lord, and their buds with them.
65:24Yea, before they call, I will answere, and whiles they speake, I will heare.
65:25The wolfe and the lambe shall feede together, and the lyon shall eate strawe like the bullocke: and to the serpent dust shall be his meate. They shall no more hurt nor destroy in all mine holy Mountaine, saith the Lord.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.