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Textus Receptus Bibles

Coverdale Bible 1535

 

   

7:1Then sayde the hye prest: Is it eue so?
7:2He sayde: Deare brethren and fathers, herken to, The God of glorye appeared vnto or father Abraha, whyle he was yet in Mesopotamia, before he dwelt in Haran,
7:3and sayde vnto him: Get ye out of thy coutre, and fro thy kynred, and come into a londe which I wil shewe ye.
7:4The wente he out of the lande of the Caldees, and dwelt in Haran. And from thece, whan his father was deed, he brought him ouer in to this londe (where ye dwell now)
7:5and gaue him no enheritauce therin, no not ye bredth of a fote: and promysed him, that he wolde geue it him to possesse, and to his sede after him, whan as yet he had no childe.
7:6But thus sayde God vnto him: Thy sede shalbe a straunger in a straunge londe, and they shal make bonde men of them, and intreate the euell foure hundreth yeares:
7:7and ye people whom they shal serue, wil I iudge, sayde God. And after that shal they go forth, and serue me in this place.
7:8And he gaue him the couenaut of circucision. And he begat Isaac, and circucised him the eight daye. And Isaac begat Iacob and Iacob begat the twolue Patriarkes.
7:9And the Patriarkes had indignacion at Ioseph, and solde hi in to Egipte. And God was with him,
7:10and delyuered him out of all his troubles, and gaue him fauoure ad wyssdome i the sight of Pharao kynge of Egipte which made him prynce ouer Egipte and ouer all his house.
7:11But there came a derth ouer all the londe of Egipte and Canaan, and a greate trouble, and oure fathers founde no sustenaunce.
7:12But Iacob herde that there was corne in Egipte, and sent oure fathers out the first tyme.
7:13And at the seconde tyme was Ioseph knowne of his brethren, and Iosephs kynred was made knowne vnto Pharao.
7:14But Ioseph sent out, and caused his father and all his kynred to be broughte, eue thre score and fyftene soules.
7:15And Iacob wente downe in to Egipte, and dyed, both he and oure fathers
7:16and were brought ouer vnto Siche, and layed in the sepulcre, that Abraham boughte for money of the children of Hemor at Sichem.
7:17Now wha the tyme of the promes drue nye (which God had sworne vnto Abraha) the people grewe and multiplied in Egipte,
7:18tyll there rose another kynge, which knewe not of Ioseph.
7:19The same dealte suttely wt oure kynred, and intreated oure fathers euell and made them to cast out the yonge children, that they shulde not remayne alyue.
7:20At the same tyme was Moses borne, and was a proper childe before God, and was norished thre monethes in his fathers house.
7:21But whan he was cast out, Pharaos doughter toke him vp, and norished him vp for hir awne sonne.
7:22And Moses was learned in all maner wyssdome of the Egipcians, and was mightie in dedes & wordes.
7:23But whan he was fourtye yeare olde, it came in to his mynde to vyset his brethren the children of Israel.
7:24And whan he sawe one of them suffre wroge, he helped him, and delyuered him, that had the harme done vnto him, and slewe the Egipcian.
7:25But he thoughte that his brethren shulde haue vnderstonde, how that God by his hande shulde saue the, howbeit they vnderstode it not.
7:26And on the nexte daye he shewed himself vnto them as they stroue together, and wolde haue set them at one agayne, and sayde: Syrs, ye are brethren, why hurte ye one another?
7:27But he that dyd his neghboure wronge, thrust him awaye, and sayde: Who made the a ruler and iudge ouer vs?
7:28Wilt thou slaye me also, as thou slewest the Egipcian yesterdaye?
7:29But Moses fled at that sayenge, and was a straunger in the lande of Madian, where he begat two sonnes.
7:30And after fourtye yeares, the angell of ye LORDE appeared vnto him vpon mount Sina, in a flamme of fyre in a busshe.
7:31Wha Moses sawe it, he wondred at the sighte. But as he drue nye to beholde, ye voyce of ye LORDE came vnto him:
7:32I am the God of thy fathers, the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Iacob. Howbeit Moses trebled, and durst not beholde.
7:33But ye LORDE sayde vnto hi: Put of thy shues from thy fete, for ye place where thou stondest, is an holy grounde.
7:34I haue well sene the trouble of my people in Egipte, and haue herde their gronynge, and am come downe to delyuer them. And now come, I wil sende the in to Egipte.
7:35This Moses, whom they refused, and sayde: Who made ye a ruler and iudge ouer vs? him had God sent to be a ruler & delyuerer by the hande of the angell, that appeared vnto him in the busshe.
7:36The same broughte them out, and dyd wonders and tokens in Egipte, and in the reed see, and in ye wyldernesse fourtye yeares.
7:37This is that Moses, which sayde vnto the children of Israel: A prophet shal the LORDE youre God rayse vp vnto you euen from amonge youre brethren, like vnto me. Him shal ye heare.
7:38This is he, that was in the congregacion in the wyldernesse with the angell, which talked with him, vpo mount Sina, and with oure fathers. This man receaued the worde of life to geue vnto vs,
7:39vnto whom oure fathers wolde not be obediet, but thrust him fro the, and in their hertes turned backe agayne in to Egipte,
7:40and sayde vnto Aaron: Make vs goddes to go before vs, for we can not tell what is become of this Moses, yt broughte vs out of the lande of Egipte.
7:41And they made a calfe at the same tyme, and offred sacrifice vnto the ymage, and reioysed in the workes of their awne handes.
7:42But God turned himselfe, & gaue them vp, so that they worshipped the hooste of heaue, as it is wrytten in the boke of the prophetes: O ye house of Israel, gaue ye me sacrifices and catel those fortye yeares in the wyldernesse?
7:43And ye toke vnto you ye tabernacle of Moloch, and the starre of youre god Remphan, ymages which ye youre selues made to worshippe the. And I wil cast you out beyonde Babilon.
7:44Oure fathers had the tabernacle of witnesse in ye wyldernesse, like as he appoynted them, whan he spake vnto Moses, that he shulde make it (acordinge to the patrone, yt he had sene.)
7:45which oure fathers also receaued, and brought it with Iosue into the londe that the Heythe had in possession, whom God droue out before the face of oure fathers, vntyll the tyme of Dauid,
7:46which founde fauoure with God, and desyred that he might fynde a tabernacle for the God of Iacob.
7:47But Salomon buylte hi an house.
7:48Howbeit ye Hyest of all dwelleth not in temples that are made with handes: As he sayeth by the prophete:
7:49Heaue is my seate, and the earth is my fote stole. What house then wil ye buylde vnto me? sayeth the LORDE: Or which is the place of my rest?
7:50Hath not my hande made all these thinges?
7:51Ye styffnecked & of vncircumcysed hertes and eares, ye allwaye resiste the holy goost: Eue as yor fathers dyd, so do ye also.
7:52Which of the prophetes haue not yor fathers persecuted? And they slewe the, which tolde before of the comynge of ye righteous, whose traytours and murthurers ye are now become.
7:53Ye receaued the lawe by the mynistracion of angels, and haue not kepte it.
7:54Whan they herde this, it wente thorow ye hertes of the, and they gnasshed vpo him with their tethe.
7:55But he beynge full of the holy goost, loked vp towarde heauen, and sawe the glorye of God, and Iesus stodinge on the righte hande of God,
7:56and sayde: Beholde, I se the heauens open, and the sonne of ma stondinge on ye righte honde of God.
7:57But they cried out with a loude voyce, & stopped their eares, and rane violently vpon him all at once,
7:58and thrust him out of the cite, and stoned him. And ye witnesses layed downe their clothes at the fete of a yonge man, which was called Saul.
7:59And they stoned Steuen, which cryed, & sayde: LORDE Iesu, receaue my sprete.
7:60And he kneled downe, & cried with a loude voyce: LORDE, laye not this synne to their charge. And wha he had thus spoken, he fell a slepe.
Coverdale Bible 1535

Coverdale Bible 1535

The Coverdale Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale and published in 1535, was the first complete English translation of the Bible to contain both the Old and New Testament and translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. The later editions (folio and quarto) published in 1539 were the first complete Bibles printed in England. The 1539 folio edition carried the royal license and was, therefore, the first officially approved Bible translation in English.

Tyndale never had the satisfaction of completing his English Bible; but during his imprisonment, he may have learned that a complete translation, based largely upon his own, had actually been produced. The credit for this achievement, the first complete printed English Bible, is due to Miles Coverdale (1488-1569), afterward bishop of Exeter (1551-1553).

The details of its production are obscure. Coverdale met Tyndale in Hamburg, Germany in 1529, and is said to have assisted him in the translation of the Pentateuch. His own work was done under the patronage of Oliver Cromwell, who was anxious for the publication of an English Bible; and it was no doubt forwarded by the action of Convocation, which, under Archbishop Cranmer's leading, had petitioned in 1534 for the undertaking of such a work.

Coverdale's Bible was probably printed by Froschover in Zurich, Switzerland and was published at the end of 1535, with a dedication to Henry VIII. By this time, the conditions were more favorable to a Protestant Bible than they had been in 1525. Henry had finally broken with the Pope and had committed himself to the principle of an English Bible. Coverdale's work was accordingly tolerated by authority, and when the second edition of it appeared in 1537 (printed by an English printer, Nycolson of Southwark), it bore on its title-page the words, "Set forth with the King's most gracious license." In licensing Coverdale's translation, King Henry probably did not know how far he was sanctioning the work of Tyndale, which he had previously condemned.

In the New Testament, in particular, Tyndale's version is the basis of Coverdale's, and to a somewhat less extent this is also the case in the Pentateuch and Jonah; but Coverdale revised the work of his predecessor with the help of the Zurich German Bible of Zwingli and others (1524-1529), a Latin version by Pagninus, the Vulgate, and Luther. In his preface, he explicitly disclaims originality as a translator, and there is no sign that he made any noticeable use of the Greek and Hebrew; but he used the available Latin, German, and English versions with judgment. In the parts of the Old Testament which Tyndale had not published he appears to have translated mainly from the Zurich Bible. [Coverdale's Bible of 1535 was reprinted by Bagster, 1838.]

In one respect Coverdale's Bible was groundbreaking, namely, in the arrangement of the books of the. It is to Tyndale's example, no doubt, that the action of Coverdale is due. His Bible is divided into six parts -- (1) Pentateuch; (2) Joshua -- Esther; (3) Job -- "Solomon's Balettes" (i.e. Canticles); (4) Prophets; (5) "Apocrypha, the books and treatises which among the fathers of old are not reckoned to be of like authority with the other books of the Bible, neither are they found in the canon of the Hebrew"; (6) the New Testament. This represents the view generally taken by the Reformers, both in Germany and in England, and so far as concerns the English Bible, Coverdale's example was decisive.