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Textus Receptus Bibles

Coverdale Bible 1535

 

   

13:1There were at Antioche in the congregacion, prophetes and teachers, as Barnabas, and Simon called Niger, and Lucius of Cyren, and Manahen Herodes the Tetrachas norsfelowe, and Saul.
13:2As they serued ye LORDE, and fasted, the holy goost sayde: Separate me out Barnabas and Saul for the worke, where vnto I haue called them.
13:3Then fasted they and prayed, and layed the handes on them, and let them go.
13:4And they beynge sent of the holy goost, came vnto Seleucia, from thence they sayled vnto Cypers.
13:5And whan they were come in to the cite Salamin, they shewed the worde of God in the synagoges of ye Iewes. And they had Ihon to their mynister.
13:6And whan they had gone thorow out the yle vnto the cyte of Paphos, they founde a certayne Sorcerer and false prophete, a Iewe (whose name was Bariesu)
13:7which was with Sergius Paulus the ruler of the countre, a ma of vnderstondinge. The same called Barnabas and Saul vnto him, and desyred to heare ye worde of God.
13:8Then the Sorcerer Elimas (for so was his name by interpretacion) withstode the, and soughte to turne awaye the ruler fro the faith.
13:9But Saul which is also called Paul, beynge full of the holy goost, loked vpon him,
13:10and sayde: O thou childe of the deuell, full of all futtyltie and all disceatfulnesse, and enemye of all righteousnes, thou ceassest not to peruerte the straight wayes of ye LORDE.
13:11And now beholde, the hade of the LORDE commeth vpon the, and thou shalt be blynde, and not se the Sonne for a season, And immediatly there fell on him a myst and darknesse, and he wente aboute, and soughte them that shulde lede him by the hande.
13:12Whan the ruler sawe what was done, he beleued, and wodred at the doctryne of the LORDE.
13:13Whan Paul and they that were with him, were departed by shippe fro Paphos, they came to Perga in the londe of Pamphilia. But Ihon departed from them, and wente agayne to Ierusalem.
13:14Neuertheles they wandred thorow from Perga, and came to Antioche in the londe of Pisidia, and wete in to the synagoge vpon the Sabbath daye, and sat downe.
13:15But after the lecture of the lawe and of the prophetes, the rulers of the synagoge sent vnto them, sayenge: Good brethren, yf ye haue eny sermon to exorte the people, saye on.
13:16Then stode Paul vp, and beckened with the hande (that they shulde holde their peace) and sayde:Ye men of Israel, and ye that feare God, herke to:
13:17The God of this people chose oure fathers, and exalted the people, whan they were straungers in the lode of Egipte, and with a mightie arme broughte he them out of it.
13:18And by the space of fortye yeares suffred he their maners in the wyldernesse,
13:19and destroyed seuen nacions in the lande of Canaan, and parted their londe amonge them by lott.
13:20After that gaue he them iudges by the space of foure hundreth and fiftye yeares, vnto the prophet Samuel.
13:21And after that they desyred a kynge, and God gaue vnto them Saul the sonne of Cis, a man of the trybe of BenIamin, fortye yeares longe.
13:22And whan he had put him downe, he set vp Dauid to be their kynge, of whom he reported, sayenge: I haue founde Dauid the sonne of Iesse, a man after my hert, he shal fulfyll all my wyll.
13:23Of this mans sede hath God ( acordinge to the promesse) broughte forth vnto the people of Israel, ye Sauioure Iesus:
13:24whan Ihon had first preached before his comynge the baptyme of repentaunce vnto Israel.
13:25But whan Ihon had fulfylled his course, he sayde: I am not he, that ye take me for. But beholde, there commeth one after me, whose shues of his fete I am not worthy to lowse.
13:26Ye men and brethren, ye children of the generacion of Abraham, and they that feare God amonge you, vnto you is ye worde of this saluacion sent.
13:27For the inhabiters of Ierusalem, and their rulers, for somoch as they knewe him not, ner yet the voyces of the prophetes (which are red euery Sabbath) haue fulfylled them in condemnynge him.
13:28And though they founde no cause of death in him, yet desyred they Pilate to kyll him.
13:29And whan they had fulfylled all that was wrytten of him, they toke him downe from the tre, and layed him in a sepulcre.
13:30But on ye thirde daye God raysed him vp from the deed,
13:31and he appeared many dayes vnto the, that wente vp with him from Galile vnto Ierusalem, which are his witnesses vnto the people.
13:32And we also declare vnto you ye promes, which was made vnto oure fathers,
13:33how that God hath fulfylled the same vnto vs their children, in yt he raysed vp Iesus agayne. As it is wrytten in the seconde Psalme: Thou art my sonne, this daye haue I begotten the.
13:34But that he hath raysed him vp fro the deed, now nomore to returne to corrupcion, he sayde on this wyse: The grace promysed to Dauid, wyl I faithfully kepe vnto you.
13:35Therfore sayeth he also in another place: Thou shalt not suffre thy Holy to se corrupcion.
13:36For Dauid, whan he in his tyme had serued the wyll of God, he fell a slepe, and was layed by his fathers, & sawe corrupcion.
13:37But he who God raysed vp agayne, sawe no corrupcion.
13:38Be it knowne vnto you therfore ye men and brethre, yt thorow this man is preached vnto you ye forgeuenesse of synnes,
13:39and fro all ye thinges, wherby ye mighte not be iustifyed in the lawe of Moses.
13:40But whosoeuer beleueth on this man, is iustifyed. Bewarre therfore, that it come not vpon you, which is spoken in the prophetes:
13:41Beholde ye despysers, and wonder at it, and perishe, for I do a worke in youre tyme, which ye shal not beleue, yf eny man tell it you.
13:42Whan the Iewes were gone out of the synagoge, the Heythen besoughte them, yt they wolde speake ye worde vnto them betwene the Sabbath dayes.
13:43And wha the cogregacion of the synagoge was broken vp, many Iewes and Proselites yt serued God, folowed Paul and Barnabas, which spake to them, and exorted them, that they shulde contynue in the grace of God.
13:44On ye Sabbath folowinge, came almost the whole cite together, to heare the worde of God.
13:45But whan the Iewes sawe the people, they were full of indignacion, and spake agaynst that which was spoken of Paul, speakinge agaynst it, & blasphemynge.
13:46But Paul and Barnabas waxed bolde, and sayde: It behoued first the worde of God to be spoken vnto you: but now that ye thrust it fro you, and counte youre selues vnworthy of euerlastinge life, lo, we turne to the Gentyles.
13:47For so hath the LORDE comaunded vs: I haue set the to be a lighte vnto ye Gentyles, yt thou be ye Saluacion vnto the ende of the earth.
13:48Whan the Gentyles herde that, they were glad, and praysed the worde of the LORDE, and beleued, eue as many as were ordeyned to euerlastinge life.
13:49And the worde of ye LORDE was spred abrode thorow out all the region.
13:50Howbeit the Iewes moued the deuoute and honorable wemen, and the chefe men of the citie, and raysed vp a persecucion agaynst Paul and Barnabas and expelled them out of their coastes.
13:51But they shoke of the dust of their fete agaynst them, and came to Iconium.
13:52And the disciples were fylled with ioye and with the holy goost.
Coverdale Bible 1535

Coverdale Bible 1535

The Coverdale Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale and published in 1535, was the first complete English translation of the Bible to contain both the Old and New Testament and translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. The later editions (folio and quarto) published in 1539 were the first complete Bibles printed in England. The 1539 folio edition carried the royal license and was, therefore, the first officially approved Bible translation in English.

Tyndale never had the satisfaction of completing his English Bible; but during his imprisonment, he may have learned that a complete translation, based largely upon his own, had actually been produced. The credit for this achievement, the first complete printed English Bible, is due to Miles Coverdale (1488-1569), afterward bishop of Exeter (1551-1553).

The details of its production are obscure. Coverdale met Tyndale in Hamburg, Germany in 1529, and is said to have assisted him in the translation of the Pentateuch. His own work was done under the patronage of Oliver Cromwell, who was anxious for the publication of an English Bible; and it was no doubt forwarded by the action of Convocation, which, under Archbishop Cranmer's leading, had petitioned in 1534 for the undertaking of such a work.

Coverdale's Bible was probably printed by Froschover in Zurich, Switzerland and was published at the end of 1535, with a dedication to Henry VIII. By this time, the conditions were more favorable to a Protestant Bible than they had been in 1525. Henry had finally broken with the Pope and had committed himself to the principle of an English Bible. Coverdale's work was accordingly tolerated by authority, and when the second edition of it appeared in 1537 (printed by an English printer, Nycolson of Southwark), it bore on its title-page the words, "Set forth with the King's most gracious license." In licensing Coverdale's translation, King Henry probably did not know how far he was sanctioning the work of Tyndale, which he had previously condemned.

In the New Testament, in particular, Tyndale's version is the basis of Coverdale's, and to a somewhat less extent this is also the case in the Pentateuch and Jonah; but Coverdale revised the work of his predecessor with the help of the Zurich German Bible of Zwingli and others (1524-1529), a Latin version by Pagninus, the Vulgate, and Luther. In his preface, he explicitly disclaims originality as a translator, and there is no sign that he made any noticeable use of the Greek and Hebrew; but he used the available Latin, German, and English versions with judgment. In the parts of the Old Testament which Tyndale had not published he appears to have translated mainly from the Zurich Bible. [Coverdale's Bible of 1535 was reprinted by Bagster, 1838.]

In one respect Coverdale's Bible was groundbreaking, namely, in the arrangement of the books of the. It is to Tyndale's example, no doubt, that the action of Coverdale is due. His Bible is divided into six parts -- (1) Pentateuch; (2) Joshua -- Esther; (3) Job -- "Solomon's Balettes" (i.e. Canticles); (4) Prophets; (5) "Apocrypha, the books and treatises which among the fathers of old are not reckoned to be of like authority with the other books of the Bible, neither are they found in the canon of the Hebrew"; (6) the New Testament. This represents the view generally taken by the Reformers, both in Germany and in England, and so far as concerns the English Bible, Coverdale's example was decisive.