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Textus Receptus Bibles

Coverdale Bible 1535

 

   

11:1The Apostles and the brethren that were in Iewrye, herde saye, that the Heythen also had receaued the worde of God.
11:2And whan Peter was come vp to Ierusalem, they that were of the circucision, chode with him,
11:3and sayde: Thou wentest in to men that are vncircumcysed, and hast eaten with them.
11:4But Peter beganne, and expounded the thinge in order vnto the and sayde:
11:5I was in ye cite of Ioppa prayege, and in a traunce I sawe a vision, a vessell commynge downe, as it had bene a greate lynnen clothe with foure corners, and let downe from heauen, and came vnto me.
11:6Into the which I loked, and considered, and sawe foure foted beestes of the earth, and wylde beestes, and wormes, and foules of the ayre.
11:7And I herde a voyce, which sayde vnto me: Ryse Peter, slaye, & eate.
11:8But I sayde: Oh no, LORDE, for there neuer entred eny commen or vncleane thinge in to my mouth.
11:9Neuertheles the voyce answered me agayne from heauen: What God hath clensed, that call not thou vncleane.
11:10This was done thre tymes, and all was taken vp agayne in to heauen.
11:11And beholde, immediatly stode there thre men before the dore of the house that I was in, sent from Cesarea vnto me.
11:12But the sprete sayde vnto me, that I shulde go with the and doute nothinge. These sixe brethre also came with me, and we entred in to the mas house.
11:13And he shewed vs, how he had sene an angell stondinge in his house, which sayde vnto him: Sende men to Ioppa, and call for Simon (whose syrname is Peter)
11:14he shal tell ye wordes, wherby thou and all thy house shal be saued.
11:15But whan I beganne to speake, the holy goost fell vpo them, like as vpon vs at ye begynnynge.
11:16Then thoughte I vpon the worde of the LORDE, how he sayde: Ihon baptysed with water, but ye shalbe baptysed with ye holy goost.
11:17For as moch then as God hath geuen them like giftes, as vnto vs, which beleue on the LORDE Iesus Christ, who was I, that I shulde be able to withstode God?
11:18Whan they herde this, they helde their peace, and praysed God, and sayde: Then hath God also to the Heithen graunted repentaunce vnto life.
11:19They that were scatred abrode thorow ye trouble yt rose aboute Steuen, walked on euerysyde vntyll Phenices, and Cipers, and Antioche, and spake the worde vnto no man but onely vnto ye Iewes.
11:20Neuertheles some of the were men of Cipers and Cyren, which came to Antioche, and spake also vnto the Grekes, & preached the Gospell of the LORDE Iesu.
11:21And ye hande of the LORDE was with the. And a greate nombre beleued, and turned vnto the LORDE.
11:22This tydinges of them came to ye eares of the cogregacion at Ierusalem. And they sent Barnabas, that he shulde go vnto Antioche.
11:23Which whan he was come thither, & sawe the grace of God, he was glad, and exorted them all, that with purpose of hert they wolde contynue in the LORDE.
11:24For he was a good man, full of the holy goost and faith. And there was a greate multitude of people added vnto the LORDE.
11:25But Barnabas departed vnto Tharsus, to seke Saul
11:26And wha he had foude hi, he brought hi to Anthioche. It chauced, that a whole yeare they were there couersaunte together in the cogregacio, & taughte moch people, so that the disciples at Antioche were first called Christen.
11:27In those dayes came there prophetes fro Ierusalem vnto Antioche.
11:28And one of them (whose name was Agabus) stode vp, and declared by the sprete a greate derth, that shulde come ouer the whole compasse of the earth: which came to passe vnder the Emperoure Claudius.
11:29But the disciples cocluded (euery one acordinge to his abylite) to sende an handreachinge vnto ye brethren that were in Iewry:
11:30which thinge they also dyd, and sent it by the handes of Barnabas and Saul.
Coverdale Bible 1535

Coverdale Bible 1535

The Coverdale Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale and published in 1535, was the first complete English translation of the Bible to contain both the Old and New Testament and translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. The later editions (folio and quarto) published in 1539 were the first complete Bibles printed in England. The 1539 folio edition carried the royal license and was, therefore, the first officially approved Bible translation in English.

Tyndale never had the satisfaction of completing his English Bible; but during his imprisonment, he may have learned that a complete translation, based largely upon his own, had actually been produced. The credit for this achievement, the first complete printed English Bible, is due to Miles Coverdale (1488-1569), afterward bishop of Exeter (1551-1553).

The details of its production are obscure. Coverdale met Tyndale in Hamburg, Germany in 1529, and is said to have assisted him in the translation of the Pentateuch. His own work was done under the patronage of Oliver Cromwell, who was anxious for the publication of an English Bible; and it was no doubt forwarded by the action of Convocation, which, under Archbishop Cranmer's leading, had petitioned in 1534 for the undertaking of such a work.

Coverdale's Bible was probably printed by Froschover in Zurich, Switzerland and was published at the end of 1535, with a dedication to Henry VIII. By this time, the conditions were more favorable to a Protestant Bible than they had been in 1525. Henry had finally broken with the Pope and had committed himself to the principle of an English Bible. Coverdale's work was accordingly tolerated by authority, and when the second edition of it appeared in 1537 (printed by an English printer, Nycolson of Southwark), it bore on its title-page the words, "Set forth with the King's most gracious license." In licensing Coverdale's translation, King Henry probably did not know how far he was sanctioning the work of Tyndale, which he had previously condemned.

In the New Testament, in particular, Tyndale's version is the basis of Coverdale's, and to a somewhat less extent this is also the case in the Pentateuch and Jonah; but Coverdale revised the work of his predecessor with the help of the Zurich German Bible of Zwingli and others (1524-1529), a Latin version by Pagninus, the Vulgate, and Luther. In his preface, he explicitly disclaims originality as a translator, and there is no sign that he made any noticeable use of the Greek and Hebrew; but he used the available Latin, German, and English versions with judgment. In the parts of the Old Testament which Tyndale had not published he appears to have translated mainly from the Zurich Bible. [Coverdale's Bible of 1535 was reprinted by Bagster, 1838.]

In one respect Coverdale's Bible was groundbreaking, namely, in the arrangement of the books of the. It is to Tyndale's example, no doubt, that the action of Coverdale is due. His Bible is divided into six parts -- (1) Pentateuch; (2) Joshua -- Esther; (3) Job -- "Solomon's Balettes" (i.e. Canticles); (4) Prophets; (5) "Apocrypha, the books and treatises which among the fathers of old are not reckoned to be of like authority with the other books of the Bible, neither are they found in the canon of the Hebrew"; (6) the New Testament. This represents the view generally taken by the Reformers, both in Germany and in England, and so far as concerns the English Bible, Coverdale's example was decisive.