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Textus Receptus Bibles

John Wycliffe Bible 1382

 

   

22:1And aftir that these thingis weren don, God assaiede Abraham, and seide to hym, Abraham! Abraham! He answerde, Y am present.
22:2God seide to him, Take thi `sone oon gendrid, whom thou louest, Ysaac; and go into the lond of visioun, and offre thou hym there in to brent sacrifice, on oon of the hillis whiche Y schal schewe to thee.
22:3Therfor Abraham roos bi niyt, and sadlide his asse, and ledde with hym twey yonge men, and Ysaac his sone; and whanne he hadde hewe trees in to brent sacrifice, he yede to the place which God hadde comaundid to him.
22:4Forsothe in the thridde dai he reiside hise iyen, and seiy a place afer;
22:5and he seide to hise children, Abide ye here with the asse, Y and the child schulen go thidur; and aftir that we han worschipid, we schulen turne ayen to you.
22:6And he took the trees of brent sacrifice, and puttide on Ysaac his sone; forsothe he bar fier, and a swerd in hise hondis. And whanne thei tweyne yeden togidere, Isaac seide to his fadir, My fadir!
22:7And he answerde, What wolt thou, sone? He seide, Lo! fier and trees, where is the beeste of brent sacrifice?
22:8Abraham seide, My sone, God schal puruey to hym the beeste of brent sacrifice.
22:9Therfor thei yeden to gidere, and camen to the place whiche God hadde schewid to hym, in which place Abraham bildide an auter, and dresside trees a boue; and whanne he hadde bounde to gidere Ysaac, his sone, he puttide Ysaac in the auter, on the heep of trees.
22:10And he helde forth his hond, and took the swerd to sacrifice his sone.
22:11And lo! an aungel of the Lord criede fro heuene, and seide, Abraham! Abraham!
22:12Which answerde, I am present. And the aungel seide to hym, Holde thou not forth thin honde on the child, nether do thou ony thing to him; now Y haue knowe that thou dredist God, and sparidist not thin oon gendrid sone for me.
22:13Abraham reiside hise iyen, and he seiy `bihynde his bak a ram cleuynge bi hornes among breris, which he took, and offride brent sacrifice for the sone.
22:14And he clepide the name of that place, The Lord seeth; wherfore it is seyd, til to dai, The Lord schal see in the hil.
22:15Forsothe the aungel of the Lord clepide Abraham the secounde tyme fro heuene,
22:16and seide, The Lord seith, Y haue swore bi my silf, for thou hast do this thing, and hast not sparid thin oon gendrid for me,
22:17Y schal blesse thee, and Y schal multiplie thi seed as the sterris of heuene, and as grauel which is in the brynk of the see; thi seed schal gete the yatis of hise enemyes;
22:18and alle the folkis of erthe schulen be blessid in thi seed, for thou obeiedist to my vois.
22:19Abraham turnede ayen to hise children, and thei yeden to Bersabee to gidere, and he dwellide there.
22:20And so whanne these thingis weren don, it was teld to Abraham that also Melcha hadde bore sones to Nachor his brother;
22:21Hus the firste gendrid, and Buz his brothir, and Chamuhel the fadir of Sireis,
22:22and Cased, and Asan, and Feldas,
22:23and Jedlaf, and Batuhel, of whom Rebecca was borun; Melcha childide these eiyte to Nachor brother of Abraham.
22:24Forsothe his concubyn, Roma bi name, childide Thabee, and Gaon, and Thaas, and Maacha.
John Wycliffe Bible 1382

John Wycliffe Bible 1382

The Wycliffe Bible is the only Bible here that was not translated from the Textus Receptus. Its inclusion here is for the Bible's historic value and for comparison in the English language.

John Wycliffe, an Oxford professor produced the first hand-written English language Bible manuscripts in the 1380's. While it is doubtful Wycliffe himself translated the versions that bear his name, he certainly can be considered the driving force behind the project. He strongly believed in having the scriptures available to the people.

Wycliffe, was well-known throughout Europe for his opposition to the teaching of the organized Church, which he believed to be contrary to the Bible. With the help of his followers (called Lollards), Wycliffe produced dozens of English language manuscript copies of the scriptures. They were translated out of the Latin Vulgate, which was the only source text available to Wycliffe. The Pope was so infuriated by his teachings and his translation of the Bible into English, that 44 years after Wycliffe died, he ordered the bones to be dug-up, crushed, and scattered in the river.