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Textus Receptus Bibles

King James Bible 1611

New Testament

 

   

2:1If there bee therefore any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of loue, if any fellowship of the Spirit, if any bowels, & mercies;
2:2Fulfill ye my ioy, that yee be like minded, hauing the same loue, being of one accord, of one minde.
2:3Let nothing bee done through strife, or vaine glory, but in lowlinesse of minde let each esteeme other better then themselues.
2:4Looke not euery man on his owne things, but euery man also on the things of others.
2:5Let this minde bee in you, which was also in Christ Iesus:
2:6Who being in the forme of God, thought it not robbery to bee equall with God:
2:7But made himselfe of no reputation, and tooke vpon him the forme of a seruant, and was made in the likenesse of men.
2:8And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himselfe, and became obedient vnto death, euen the death of the Crosse.
2:9Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and giuen him a Name which is aboue euery name:
2:10That at the Name of Iesus euery knee should bow, of things in heauen, and things in earth, and things vnder the earth:
2:11And that euery tongue should confesse, that Iesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
2:12Wherefore, my beloued, as yee haue alwayes obeyed, not as in my presence onely, but now much more in my absence; worke out your owne saluation with feare, and trembling.
2:13For it is God which worketh in you, both to will, and to doe, of his good pleasure.
2:14Doe all things without murmurings, and disputings:
2:15That yee may bee blamelesse and harmelesse, the sonnes of God, without rebuke, in the middes of a crooked and peruerse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world:
2:16Holding foorth the word of life, that I may reioyce in the day of Christ, that I haue not runne in vaine, neither laboured in vaine.
2:17Yea, and if I bee offered vpon the sacrifice and seruice of your faith, I ioy, and reioyce with you all.
2:18For the same cause also doe ye ioy, and reioyce with me.
2:19But I trust in the Lord Iesus, to send Timotheus shortly vnto you, that I also may bee of good comfort, when I know your state.
2:20For I haue no man like minded, who will naturally care for your state.
2:21For all seeke their owne, not the things which are Iesus Christs.
2:22But ye know the proofe of him, That as a sonne with the father, hee hath serued with me, in the Gospel.
2:23Him therefore I hope to send presently, so soone as I shall see how it wil goe with me.
2:24But I trust in the Lord, that I also my selfe shall come shortly.
2:25Yet I supposed it necessary, to send to you Epaphroditus my brother and companion in labour, and fellow souldiour, but your messenger, and hee that ministred to my wants.
2:26For hee longed after you all, and was full of heauinesse, because that yee had heard that he had bene sicke.
2:27For indeed he was sicke nigh vnto death, but God had mercy on him: and not on him onely, but on mee also, lest I should haue sorow vpon sorow.
2:28I sent him therefore the more carefully, that when ye see him againe, ye may reioyce, and that I may bee the lesse sorrowfull.
2:29Receiue him therfore in the Lord with all gladnesse, and hold such in reputation:
2:30Because for the worke of Christ he was nigh vnto death, not regarding his life, to supply your lacke of seruice toward me.
King James Bible 1611

King James Bible 1611

The commissioning of the King James Bible took place at conference at the Hampton Court Palace in London England in 1604. When King James came to the throne he wanted unity and stability in the church and state, but was well aware that the diversity of his constituents had to be considered. There were the Papists who longed for the English church to return to the Roman Catholic fold and the Latin Vulgate. There were Puritans, loyal to the crown but wanting even more distance from Rome. The Puritans used the Geneva Bible which contained footnotes that the king regarded as seditious. The Traditionalists made up of Bishops of the Anglican Church wanted to retain the Bishops Bible.

The king commissioned a new English translation to be made by over fifty scholars representing the Puritans and Traditionalists. They took into consideration: the Tyndale New Testament, the Matthews Bible, the Great Bible and the Geneva Bible. The great revision of the Bible had begun. From 1605 to 1606 the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609 the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge (16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as "The 1611 King James Bible" came off the printing press.