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Textus Receptus Bibles

Julia E. Smith Translation 1876

 

   

11:1I say then, Has God rejected his people It may not be. For I also am an Israelite, of Abraham's seed, of the tribe of Benjamin.
11:2God has not rejected his people whom he foreknew. Or know ye not in Elias, what says the writing? how he addresses God against Israel, saying,
11:3Lord, thy prophets have they killed, and dug down thine altars; and I alone was left, and they seek my soul.
11:4But what say to him the intimations of divine will I have left to myself seven thousand men, who bent not the knee to Baal.
11:5So then also in the time now has been a remnant according to the election of grace.
11:6And if to grace, it is no more of works: otherwise grace is no more grace. And if of works, it is no more grace: otherwise work is no more work.
11:7What then What Israel seeks for, this be attained not; but the selection attained, and the rest were hardened.
11:8(As has been written, God gave them the spirit of mortal pain, eyes not to see, and earn not to hear;) even to this day.
11:9And David says, Let their table be for a snare, and for booty, and for a stumblingblock, and for a retribution to them:
11:10Let their eyes be darkened not to see, and let them bend their back always.
11:11I say then, Did they stumble that they might fall? It may not be: but by their fall salvation to the nations, to make them jealous.
11:12And if their fall the riches of the world, and their disaster the riches of the nations; how much more their fulness?
11:13(For I speak to you the nations, inasmuch as truly I am the sent of the nations, I highly value my service:
11:14If in some way I might make jealous my flesh, and I might save some of them.)
11:15For if their rejection the reconciliation of the world, what the reception, but life from the dead?
11:16And if the first fruit holy, also the mixture: and if the root holy, also the young shoots.
11:17And if certain of the young shoots were broken off, and thou, being a wild olive tree, wert grafted in them, and wert a partaker of the root and fatness of the olive tree;
11:18Act not proudly to the young shoots. And if thou boastest, thou bearest not the root, but the root thee.
11:19Thou wilt say then, That the young shoots were broken off, that I might be grafted in.
11:20Well; for unbelief were they broken off, and thou standest by faith. Be not highminded, but do thou fear:
11:21For if God spared not the young shoots according to nature, how will he either spare thee
11:22Behold then the goodness and severity of God: truly upon the fallen, severity; and upon thee, goodness, if thou continue in goodness: otherwise shalt thou also be cut off.
11:23And they also, if they continue not in unbelief, shall be grafted in:for God is able to graft them in again.
11:24For if thou according to nature wert cut out of the wild olive tree, and against nature wert grafted into the cultivated olive tree: how much more these, according to nature, shall be grafted into their own olive tree
11:25For I will not ye should not know, brethren, this mystery, lest ye be wise with yourselves; for hardness from part has been to Israel, till the filling up of the nations come in.
11:26And so all Israel shall be saved: as has been written, The Deliverer shall come out of Sion, and turn away profanation from Jacob.
11:27And this the covenant to them with me, when I take away their sins.
11:28Truly concerning the good news, enemies for you: and concerning the selection, beloved for the fathers.
11:29For the favors and calling of God not causing repentance.
11:30For as also ye, when ye were disobedient to God, but now ye have been commiserated by the unbelief of these:
11:31So they now also were disobedient, by your mercy that they also be commiserated.
11:32For God shut them all up together in unbelief, that he might commiserate all.
11:33O the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! his judgments how unsearchable, and his ways not traced out!
11:34For who knew the mind of the Lord? or who was his counsel?
11:35Or who first gave to him, and it shall be given back to him?
11:36For of him, and by him, and to him, all things: to him the glory forever Amen.
Julia Smith and her sister

Julia E. Smith Translation 1876

The Julia Evelina Smith Parker Translation is considered the first complete translation of the Bible into English by a woman. The Bible was titled The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments; Translated Literally from the Original Tongues, and was published in 1876.

Julia Smith, of Glastonbury, Connecticut had a working knowledge of Latin, Greek and Hebrew. Her father had been a Congregationalist minister before he became a lawyer. Having read the Bible in its original languages, she set about creating her own translation, which she completed in 1855, after a number of drafts. The work is a strictly literal rendering, always translating a Greek or Hebrew word with the same word wherever possible. Smith accomplished this work on her own in the span of eight years (1847 to 1855). She had sought out no help in the venture, even writing, "I do not see that anybody can know more about it than I do." Smith's insistence on complete literalness, plus an effort to translate each original word with the same English word, combined with an odd notion of Hebrew tenses (often translating the Hebrew imperfect tense with the English future) results in a translation that is mechanical and often nonsensical. However, such a translation if overly literal might be valuable to consult in checking the meaning of some individual verse. One notable feature of this translation was the prominent use of the Divine Name, Jehovah, throughout the Old Testament of this Bible version.

In 1876, at 84 years of age some 21 years after completing her work, she finally sought publication. The publication costs ($4,000) were personally funded by Julia and her sister Abby Smith. The 1,000 copies printed were offered for $2.50 each, but her household auction in 1884 sold about 50 remaining copies.

The translation fell into obscurity as it was for the most part too literal and lacked any flow. For example, Jer. 22:23 was given as follows: "Thou dwelling in Lebanon, building as nest in the cedars, how being compassionated in pangs coming to thee the pain as in her bringing forth." However, the translation was the only Contemporary English translation out of the original languages available to English readers until the publication of The British Revised Version in 1881-1894.(The New testament was published in 1881, the Old in 1884, and the Apocrypha in 1894.) This makes it an invaluable Bible for its period.