Loading...

Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

4:1Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for vs in the flesh, arme your selues likewise with the same minde, which is, that he which hath suffered in the flesh, hath ceased from sinne,
4:2That he hence forward should liue (as much time as remaineth in the flesh) not after the lusts of men, but after the will of God.
4:3For it is sufficient for vs that we haue spet the time past of ye life, after the lust of the Gentiles, walking in wantonnes, lustes, drunkennes, in gluttonie, drinkings, and in abominable idolatries.
4:4Wherein it seemeth to them strange, that yee runne not with them vnto the same excesse of riot: therefore speake they euill of you,
4:5Which shall giue accounts to him, that is readie to iudge quicke and dead.
4:6For vnto this purpose was the Gospell preached also vnto the dead, that they might bee condemned, according to men in the flesh, but might liue according to God in the spirit.
4:7Now the ende of all things is at hand. Be ye therefore sober, and watching in prayer.
4:8But aboue all thinges haue feruent loue among you: for loue shall couer the multitude of sinnes.
4:9Be ye harberous one to another, without grudging.
4:10Let euery man as hee hath receiued the gift, minister the same one to another, as good disposers of the manifolde grace of God.
4:11If any man speake, let him speake as the wordes of God. If any man minister, let him do it as of the abilitie which God ministreth, that God in al things may be glorified through Iesus Christ, to whome is prayse and dominion for euer, and euer, Amen.
4:12Dearely beloued, thinke it not strange concerning the firie triall, which is among you to proue you, as though some strange thing were come vnto you:
4:13But reioyce, in asmuch as ye are partakers of Christs suffrings, that when his glory shall appeare, ye may be glad and reioyce.
4:14If yee be railed vpon for the Name of Christ, blessed are ye: for the spirit of glory, and of God resteth vpon you: which on their part is euill spoken of: but on your part is glorified.
4:15But let none of you suffer as a murtherer, or as a thiefe, or an euil doer, or as a busibodie in other mens matters.
4:16But if any man suffer as a Christian, let him not bee ashamed: but let him glorifie God in this behalfe.
4:17For the time is come, that iudgement must beginne at the house of God. If it first beginne at vs, what shall the ende be of them which obey not the Gospel of God?
4:18And if the righteous scarcely bee saued, where shall the vngodly and the sinner appeare?
4:19Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God, commit their soules to him in well doing, as vnto a faithfull Creator.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.