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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

1:1The booke of the generation of Jesus Christ the sonne of Dauid, the sonne of Abraham.
1:2Abraham begate Isaac. And Isaac begate Iacob. And Iacob begat Iudas and his brethren.
1:3And Iudas begate Phares, and Zara of Thamar. And Phares begate Esrom. And Esrom begate Aram.
1:4And Aram begate Aminadab. And Aminadab begate Naasson. And Naasson begat Salmon.
1:5And Salmon begate Booz of Rachab. And Booz begat Obed of Ruth. and Obed begat Iesse.
1:6And Iesse begate Dauid the King. And Dauid the King begate Salomon of her that was the wife of Vrias.
1:7And Salomon begate Roboam. And Roboam begate Abia. And Abia begate Asa.
1:8And Asa begate Iosaphat. And Iosaphat begate Ioram. And Ioram begate Hozias.
1:9And Hozias begat Ioatham. And Ioatham begate Achaz. And Achaz begate Ezekias.
1:10And Ezekias begate Manasses. And Manasses begate Amon. And Amon begate Iosias.
1:11And Iosias begate Iakim. And Iakim begate Iechonias and his brethren about the time they were caried away to Babylon.
1:12And after they were caried away into Babylon, Iechonias begate Salathiel. And Salathiel begate Zorobabel.
1:13And Zorobabel begate Abiud. And Abiud begate Eliacim. And Eliacim begate Azor.
1:14And Azor begate Sadoc. And Sadoc begate Achim. And Achim begate Eliud.
1:15And Eliud begate Eleazar. And Eleazar begate Matthan. And Matthan begate Iacob.
1:16And Iacob begat Ioseph ye husband of Mary, of whom was borne Jesus, that is called Christ.
1:17So all the generations from Abraham to Dauid, are fourtene generations. And from Dauid vntil they were caried away into Babylon, fourtene generations: and after they were caried away into Babylon vntill Christ, fourteene generations.
1:18Nowe the birth of Jesus Christ was thus, When as his mother Mary was betrothed to Ioseph, before they came together, shee was found with childe of the holy Ghost.
1:19Then Ioseph her husband being a iust man, and not willing to make her a publike example, was minded to put her away secretly.
1:20But whiles he thought these things, behold, the Angel of the Lord appeared vnto him in a dreame, saying, Ioseph, the sonne of Dauid, feare not to take Mary thy wife: for that which is conceiued in her, is of the holy Ghost.
1:21And she shall bring foorth a sonne, and thou shalt call his name JESUS: for hee shall saue his people from their sinnes.
1:22And al this was done that it might be fulfilled, which is spoken of the Lord by ye Prophet, saying,
1:23Behold, a virgine shalbe with childe, and shall beare a sonne, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which is by interpretation, God with vs.
1:24Then Ioseph, being raised from sleepe, did as the Angel of the Lord had inioyned him, and tooke his wife.
1:25But he knew her not, til she had broght forth her first borne sonne, and he called his name JESUS.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.