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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

16:1I Commende vnto you Phebe our sister, which is a seruaunt of the Church of Cenchrea:
16:2That ye receiue her in the Lord, as it becommeth Saintes, and that ye assist her in whatsoeuer businesse she needeth of your ayde: for she hath giuen hospitalitie vnto many, and to me also.
16:3Greete Priscilla, and Aquila my fellowe helpers in Christ Iesus,
16:4(Which haue for my life laide downe their owne necke. Vnto whom not I onely giue thankes, but also all the Churches of the Gentiles.)
16:5Likewise greete the Church that is in their house. Salute my beloued Epenetus, which is the first fruites of Achaia in Christ.
16:6Greete Marie which bestowed much labour on vs.
16:7Salute Andronicus and Iunia my cousins and fellowe prisoners, which are notable among the Apostles, and were in Christ before me.
16:8Greete Amplias my beloued in the Lord.
16:9Salute Vrbanus our fellow helper in Christ, and Stachys my beloued.
16:10Salute Apelles approoued in Christ. Salute them which are of Aristobulus friendes.
16:11Salute Herodion my kinsman. Greete them which are of the friendes of Narcissus which are in the Lord.
16:12Salute Tryphena and Tryphosa, which women labour in the Lord. Salute the beloued Persis, which woman hath laboured much in the Lord.
16:13Salute Rufus chosen in the Lord, and his mother and mine.
16:14Greete Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermas, Patrobas, Mercurius, and the brethren which are with them.
16:15Salute Philologus and Iulias, Nereas, and his sister, and Olympas, and all the Saintes which are with them.
16:16Salute one another with an holy kisse. The Churches of Christ salute you.
16:17Now I beseech you brethren, marke them diligently which cause diuision and offences, contrary to the doctrine which ye haue learned, and auoide them.
16:18For they that are such, serue not the Lord Iesus Christ, but their owne bellies, and with faire speach and flattering deceiue the heartes of the simple.
16:19For your obedience is come abroade among all: I am glad therefore of you: but yet I woulde haue you wise vnto that which is good, and simple concerning euill.
16:20The God of peace shall treade Satan vnder your feete shortly. The grace of our Lord Iesus Christ be with you.
16:21Timotheus my helper, and Lucius, and Iason, and Sosipater my kinsemen, salute you.
16:22I Tertius, which wrote out this Epistle, salute you in the Lord.
16:23Gains mine hoste, and of the whole Church saluteth you. Erastus the steward of the citie saluteth you, and Quartus a brother.
16:24The grace of our Lord Iesus Christ be with you all. Amen.
16:25To him nowe that is of power to establish you according to my Gospel, and preaching of Iesus Christ, by the reuelation of the mysterie, which was kept secrete since the worlde began:
16:26(But nowe is opened, and published among all nations by the Scriptures of the Prophetes, at the commandement of the euerlasting God for the obedience of faith)
16:27To God, I say, only wise, be praise through Iesus Christ for euer. Amen.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.