Loading...

Textus Receptus Bibles

John Wycliffe Bible 1382

 

   

4:1What thanne schulen we seie, that Abraham oure fadir aftir the flesch foond?
4:2For if Abraham is iustified of werkis of the lawe, he hath glorie, but not anentis God.
4:3For what seith the scripture? Abraham bileued to God, and it was arettid to him to riytwisnesse.
4:4And to hym that worchith mede is not arettid bi grace, but bi dette.
4:5Sotheli to hym that worchith not, but bileueth in to hym that iustefieth a wickid man, his feith is arettid to riytwisnesse, aftir the purpos of Goddis grace.
4:6As Dauid seith the blessidnesse of a man, whom God acceptith, he yyueth to hym riytwisnesse with outen werkis of the lawe,
4:7Blessid ben thei, whos wickidnessis ben foryouun, and whos synnes ben hid.
4:8Blessid is that man, to whom God arettide not synne.
4:9Thanne whether dwellith this blisfulnesse oneli in circumcisioun, or also in prepucie? For we seien, that the feith was arettid to Abraham to riytwisnesse.
4:10Hou thanne was it arettid? in circumcisioun, or in prepucie? Not in circumcisioun, but in prepucie.
4:11And he took a signe of circumcisioun, a tokenyng of riytwisnesse of the feith which is in prepucie, that he be fadir of alle men bileuynge bi prepucie, that it be arettid also to hem to riytwisnesse;
4:12and that he be fadir of circumcisioun, not onely to hem that ben of circumcisioun, but also to hem that suen the steppis of the feith, which feith is in prepucie of oure fader Abraham.
4:13For not bi the lawe is biheest to Abraham, or to his seed, that he schulde be eir of the world, but bi the riytwisnesse of feith.
4:14For if thei that ben of the lawe, ben eiris, feith is distried, biheest is don awey.
4:15For the lawe worchith wraththe; for where is no lawe, there is no trespas, nethir is trespassyng.
4:16Therfor riytfulnesse is of the feith, that bi grace biheeste be stable to ech seed, not to that seed oneli that is of the lawe, but to that that is of the feith of Abraham, which is fadir of vs alle.
4:17As it is writun, For Y haue set thee fadir of many folkis, bifor God to whom thou hast bileued. Which God quykeneth deed men, and clepith tho thingis that ben not, as tho that ben.
4:18Which Abraham ayens hope bileuede in to hope, that he schulde be maad fader of many folkis, as it was seid to hym, Thus schal thi seed be, as the sterris of heuene, and as the grauel that is in the brenke of the see.
4:19And he was not maad vnstidfast in the bileue, nether he biheelde his bodi thanne nyy deed, whanne he was almost of an hundrid yeer, ne the wombe of Sare nyy deed.
4:20Also in the biheeste of God he doutide not with vntrist; but he was coumfortid in bileue,
4:21yyuynge glorie to God, witynge moost fulli that what euere thingis God hath bihiyt, he is myyti also to do.
4:22Therfor it was arettid to hym to riytwisnesse.
4:23And it is not writun oneli for him, that it was arettid to hym to riytwisnesse,
4:24but also for vs, to whiche it schal be arettid, that bileuen in him that reiside oure Lord Jhesu Crist fro deeth.
4:25Which was bitakun for oure synnes, and roos ayen for oure iustefiyng.
John Wycliffe Bible 1382

John Wycliffe Bible 1382

The Wycliffe Bible is the only Bible here that was not translated from the Textus Receptus. Its inclusion here is for the Bible's historic value and for comparison in the English language.

John Wycliffe, an Oxford professor produced the first hand-written English language Bible manuscripts in the 1380's. While it is doubtful Wycliffe himself translated the versions that bear his name, he certainly can be considered the driving force behind the project. He strongly believed in having the scriptures available to the people.

Wycliffe, was well-known throughout Europe for his opposition to the teaching of the organized Church, which he believed to be contrary to the Bible. With the help of his followers (called Lollards), Wycliffe produced dozens of English language manuscript copies of the scriptures. They were translated out of the Latin Vulgate, which was the only source text available to Wycliffe. The Pope was so infuriated by his teachings and his translation of the Bible into English, that 44 years after Wycliffe died, he ordered the bones to be dug-up, crushed, and scattered in the river.