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Textus Receptus Bibles

Matthew's Bible 1537

 

   

4:1For marck, the day commeth, that shall burne as an ouen: and al the proude, yea and al such as do wickednesse, shalbe straw: and the daye that is for to come, shall burne them vp (sayeth the Lorde of hostes) so that it shall leaue them neyther rote nor braunche.
4:2But vnto you that feare my name, shall the Sonne of ryghteousnesse aryse, and healthe shalbe vnder his winges: ye shal go forth, & multipply as the fat calues.
4:3Ye shall treade doune the vngodlye: for they shalbe lyke the asshes vnder the soles of your fete, in the day that I shall make, sayeth the Lord of hostes.
4:4Remembre the lawe of Moses my seruaunt whyche I commytted vnto hym in Oreb for al Israel, with the stratutes and ordynaunces.
4:5Beholde, I wyl sende you Elias the Prophet: before the comming of the daye of the greate and fearfull Lorde.
4:6He shall turne the hertes of the fathers to their chyldren, and the hertes of the children to their fathers, that I come not, & smite the earth with cursynge.
Matthew's Bible 1537

Matthew's Bible 1537

The Matthew Bible, also known as Matthew's Version, was first published in 1537 by John Rogers, under the pseudonym "Thomas Matthew". It combined the New Testament of William Tyndale, and as much of the Old Testament as he had been able to translate before being captured and put to death, with the translations of Myles Coverdale as to the balance of the Old Testament and the Apocrypha, except the Apocryphal Prayer of Manasses. It is thus a vital link in the main sequence of English Bible translations.