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Textus Receptus Bibles

King James Bible 1611

 

   

3:1Likewise, ye wiues, be in subiection to your owne husbands, that if any obey not the word, they also may without the word be wonne by the conuersation of the wiues:
3:2While they beholde your chaste conuersation coupled with feare:
3:3Whose adorning, let it not bee that outward adorning, of plaiting the haire, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparell.
3:4But let it bee the hidden man of the heart, in that which is not corruptible, euen the ornament of a meeke and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price.
3:5For after this manner in the olde time, the holy women also who trusted in God adorned themselues, beeing in subiection vnto their owne husbands.
3:6Euen as Sara obeyed Abraham, calling him Lord, whose daughters ye are as long as ye doe well, and are not afraid with any amazement.
3:7Likewise ye husbands, dwel with them according to knowledge, giuing honour vnto the wife as vnto the weaker vessel, and as being heires together of the grace of life, that your prayers be not hindered.
3:8Finally be ye all of one minde, hauing compassion one of another, loue as brethren, be pitifull, be courteous,
3:9Not rendring euill for euill, or railing for railing: but contrarywise blessing, knowing that yee are thereunto called, that ye should inherite a blessing.
3:10For hee that will loue life, and see good dayes, let him refraine his tongue from euil, and his lips that they speake no guile:
3:11Let him eschew euil and do good, let him seeke peace and ensue it.
3:12For the eyes of the Lord are ouer the righteous, and his eares are open vnto their prayers: but the face of the Lord is against them that doe euill.
3:13And who is hee that will harme you, if ye bee followers of that which is good?
3:14But and if ye suffer for righteousnes sake, happy are ye, and be not afraid of their terrour, neither be troubled:
3:15But sanctifie the Lord God in your hearts, & be ready alwayes to giue an answere to euery man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you, with meekenesse and feare:
3:16Hauing a good conscience, that whereas they speake euill of you, as of euill doers, they may bee ashamed that falsly accuse your good conuersation in Christ.
3:17For it is better, if the will of God be so, that yee suffer for well doing, then for euill doing.
3:18For Christ also hath once suffered for sinnes, the iust for the vniust, that he might bring vs to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit.
3:19By which also he went and preached vnto the spirits in prison,
3:20Which sometime were disobedient, when once the long-suffering of God waited in the dayes of Noah, while the Arke was a preparing: wherein few, that is, eight soules were saued by water.
3:21The like figure whereunto, euen Baptisme, doth also now saue vs, (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answere of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Iesus Christ.
3:22Who is gone into heauen, and is on the right hand of God, Angels, and authorities, and powers being made subiect vnto him.
King James Bible 1611

King James Bible 1611

The commissioning of the King James Bible took place at a conference at the Hampton Court Palace in London England in 1604. When King James came to the throne he wanted unity and stability in the church and state, but was well aware that the diversity of his constituents had to be considered. There were the Papists who longed for the English church to return to the Roman Catholic fold and the Latin Vulgate. There were Puritans, loyal to the crown but wanting even more distance from Rome. The Puritans used the Geneva Bible which contained footnotes that the king regarded as seditious. The Traditionalists made up of Bishops of the Anglican Church wanted to retain the Bishops Bible.

The king commissioned a new English translation to be made by over fifty scholars representing the Puritans and Traditionalists. They took into consideration: the Tyndale New Testament, the Matthews Bible, the Great Bible and the Geneva Bible. The great revision of the Bible had begun. From 1605 to 1606 the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609 the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge (16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as "The 1611 King James Bible" came off the printing press.