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Textus Receptus Bibles

King James Bible 1611

New Testament

 

   

4:1For beholde, the day commeth, that shall burne as an ouen, and all the proud, yea and all that doe wickedly shalbe stubble: and the day that commeth, shal burne them vp, saith the Lord of hostes, that it shall leaue them neither roote nor branch.
4:2But vnto you that feare my Name, shall the Sunne of righteousnesse arise with healing in his wings, and shall goe foorth and grow vp as calues of the staule.
4:3And yee shall treade downe the wicked: for they shall bee ashes vnder the soles of your feet, in the day that I shall doe this, saith the Lord of hosts.
4:4Remember yee the Law of Moses my seruant, which I commanded vnto him in Horeb for all Israel, with the Statutes and iudgements.
4:5Beholde, I will send you Eliiah the Prophet, before the comming of the great and dreadfull day of the Lord.
4:6And hee shall turne the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.
King James Bible 1611

King James Bible 1611

The commissioning of the King James Bible took place at conference at the Hampton Court Palace in London England in 1604. When King James came to the throne he wanted unity and stability in the church and state, but was well aware that the diversity of his constituents had to be considered. There were the Papists who longed for the English church to return to the Roman Catholic fold and the Latin Vulgate. There were Puritans, loyal to the crown but wanting even more distance from Rome. The Puritans used the Geneva Bible which contained footnotes that the king regarded as seditious. The Traditionalists made up of Bishops of the Anglican Church wanted to retain the Bishops Bible.

The king commissioned a new English translation to be made by over fifty scholars representing the Puritans and Traditionalists. They took into consideration: the Tyndale New Testament, the Matthews Bible, the Great Bible and the Geneva Bible. The great revision of the Bible had begun. From 1605 to 1606 the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609 the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge (16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as "The 1611 King James Bible" came off the printing press.