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Textus Receptus Bibles

Julia E. Smith Translation 1876

 

   

33:1Wo to thee oppressing, and thou not oppressed; and spoiling, and they spoiled not upon thee! when thou finishing to oppress, thou shalt be oppressed; when thou ceasing to spoil, they shall spoil upon thee.
33:2O Jehovah, pity us: we hoped for thee: be thou their arm for the mornings, also our salvation in time of straits.
33:3From the voice of the multitude peoples fled; from thy lifting up, nations were scattered.
33:4And your spoil was gathered the gathering of the locust: as the running about of locusts he ran to and fro upon it
33:5Jehovah was exalted; for he dwells On high: he filled Zion with judgment and justice.
33:6And the stability of thy times, the strength of salvation, was wisdom and knowledge: the fear of Jehovah this his treasure.
33:7Behold the lions of God they cried out without: the messengers of peace shall weep bitterness.
33:8The highways lay waste, the traveler passing by, ceased: he brake the covenant, he despised the cities, he reckoned them not men.
33:9The earth mourning, languished: Lebanon being ashamed, pined away: Sharon was as a sterile region, and Bashan was shaken, and Carmel.
33:10Now will I rise, Jehovah will say; now will I be exalted; now will I be lifted up.
33:11Ye shall conceive dry grass, ye shall bring forth straw: your spirit of fire shall consume you.
33:12And peoples were the burnings of lime; thorns cut down, in fire shall they be burnt
33:13Hear, ye afar off, what I did and know, ye drawing near, my strength.
33:14The sinners in Zion trembled; trembling seized the profane. Who to us shall sojourn with devouring fire? who to us with everlasting burning?
33:15He going in justice and speaking uprightness, rejecting in the plunder of oppression; shaking his hands from holding upon a gift, shutting his ear from the hearing of bloods, and binding up his eyes from looking upon evil;
33:16He shall dwell upon heights: the strongholds of rocks his height: his bread was given; his waters sure.
33:17Thine eyes shall perceive the king in his beauty: they shall see the land from far off.
33:18Thy heart shall meditate terror. Where the scribe? where the weigher? where he writing the towers?
33:19Thou shalt not see a firm people, a people of a deep lip above,hearing; of a stammering tongue, of no understanding.
33:20Behold Zion the city of our appointment: thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet dwelling, the tent shall not remove; its pegs shall not be pulled up forever, and none of its cords shall be broken.
33:21But there the mighty Jehovah to us a place of rivers, rivers broad of hands; a ship with the oar shall not go in it, and a mighty ship shall not pass over it.
33:22For Jehovah is our Judge, Jehovah our law-giver, Jehovah our king; he will save us.
33:23Thy cords were broken in pieces; they will not well strengthen their mast; they spread not the flag: then was the prey of a great spoil divided; the lame plundered the plunder.
33:24And the inhabitant shall not say, I was sick: to the people dwelling in it, iniquity was lifted up.
Julia Smith and her sister

Julia E. Smith Translation 1876

The Julia Evelina Smith Parker Translation is considered the first complete translation of the Bible into English by a woman. The Bible was titled The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments; Translated Literally from the Original Tongues, and was published in 1876.

Julia Smith, of Glastonbury, Connecticut had a working knowledge of Latin, Greek and Hebrew. Her father had been a Congregationalist minister before he became a lawyer. Having read the Bible in its original languages, she set about creating her own translation, which she completed in 1855, after a number of drafts. The work is a strictly literal rendering, always translating a Greek or Hebrew word with the same word wherever possible. Smith accomplished this work on her own in the span of eight years (1847 to 1855). She had sought out no help in the venture, even writing, "I do not see that anybody can know more about it than I do." Smith's insistence on complete literalness, plus an effort to translate each original word with the same English word, combined with an odd notion of Hebrew tenses (often translating the Hebrew imperfect tense with the English future) results in a translation that is mechanical and often nonsensical. However, such a translation if overly literal might be valuable to consult in checking the meaning of some individual verse. One notable feature of this translation was the prominent use of the Divine Name, Jehovah, throughout the Old Testament of this Bible version.

In 1876, at 84 years of age some 21 years after completing her work, she finally sought publication. The publication costs ($4,000) were personally funded by Julia and her sister Abby Smith. The 1,000 copies printed were offered for $2.50 each, but her household auction in 1884 sold about 50 remaining copies.

The translation fell into obscurity as it was for the most part too literal and lacked any flow. For example, Jer. 22:23 was given as follows: "Thou dwelling in Lebanon, building as nest in the cedars, how being compassionated in pangs coming to thee the pain as in her bringing forth." However, the translation was the only Contemporary English translation out of the original languages available to English readers until the publication of The British Revised Version in 1881-1894.(The New testament was published in 1881, the Old in 1884, and the Apocrypha in 1894.) This makes it an invaluable Bible for its period.